6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. No need to fear PEP
  2. Pricey Petrojam insurance
  3. $260m ganja study
  4. FDA okays marijuana-based drug for seizures
  5. USF chairman shocked by calls for forensic audit
  6. Portland road a death trap

1. No need to fear PEP

Officials from the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information fielded questions related to the implementation and assessment of the Primary Exit Profile (PEP), which will replace the Grade Six Achievement Test, during an Editors’ Forum held yesterday at The Gleaner‘s North Street offices. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Pricey Petrojam insurance

Chairman of Marathon Insurance Brokers (MIB), Richard Burgher, is demanding answers from the Government as to why Petrojam turned down a tender offer by to provide insurance services for its workers, but awarded the contract to a competitor even though MBI’s proposal was $420 million cheaper. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. $260m ganja study

The Jamaica Medical Cannabis Corporation (JMMC) is investing US$2 million (J$264,000,000) into research on local ganja strains in order to ascertain with scientific accuracy their medicinal potential, over the next 10 years. Professor Errol Morrison, director general of the National Commission on Science and Technology, spoke to the enormity of the project titled ‘Identification, Isolation and Conservation of Local Strains of Cannabis for Medicinal Use’ during Monday’s signing ceremony. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. FDA okays marijuana-based drug for seizures

United States health regulators on Monday approved the first prescription drug made from marijuana, a milestone that could spur more research into a drug that remains illegal under federal law, despite growing legalisation for recreational and medical use. The Food and Drug Administration approved the medication, called Epidiolex, to treat two rare forms of epilepsy that begin in childhood. But it’s not quite medical marijuana. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. USF chairman shocked by calls for forensic audit

Robert Lawrence, chairman of the Universal Service Fund (USF), has expressed shock that major private sector groups have called for a forensic audit at the state agency tasked with providing universal access to information through the provision of broadband services island wide. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Portland road a death trap

Unless immediate attention is given to a roadway leading into the community of Clear Spring in east Portland, which is being undermined, hundreds of residents could be marooned in the event of heavy rainfall. The farming community, which has already experienced the loss of a bridge during heavy rains in October 2015, is faced with a crisis as residents now have to walk through a riverbed to get their homes and farms. This is considered by many to be dangerous, especially during bad weather. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.