6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. New police commish named
  2. One child psychiatrist?
  3. Incoming police commish promises to quell crime
  4. SVL pulls National Champs sponsorship
  5. Multi-million dollar madness
  6. Case pile-up in courts during Hilary term

1. New police commish named

Amid wide public support for incoming Police Commissioner George Quallo, there is a suggestion from a former high-ranking member of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) that his first order of business must be tackling the country’s high murder rate and other violent crimes. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. One child psychiatrist?

Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton might have to go cap in hand to the finance ministry for more money to increase the personnel allocated to the Community Mental Health Services. That is one of the recommendations of the Mental Health and Homeless Task Force, which was established by Tufton last year. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Incoming police commish promises to quell crime

Deputy Commissioner of Police George Quallo is to be appointed Commissioner of Police effective April 18. This afternoon, Quallo told The Gleaner that he was advised by the Police Service Commission about the appointment around 3 p.m. He also vowed that the team he leads will be able to effectively reduce crime. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. SVL pulls National Champs sponsorship

After a 13-year relationship gaming company Supreme Ventures Limited (SVL) has withdrawn its sponsorship from the Jamaica Athletic Administrative Association (JAAA) National Senior and Junior Track and Field Championships. President of the JAAA, Dr Warren Blake, told The Gleaner yesterday that he had been told of the decision in recent discussions with the SVL. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Multi-million dollar madness

Failure to address mental health issues in children could end up costing the Government millions of dollars in providing legal and other corrective measures if nothing is done to address the problem, asserts special educator Ruthlyn James, director at Adonijah Group of Schools for Intellectual Disabilities. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Case pile-up in courts during Hilary term

The Hilary term of the Home Circuit Court opened in January with a total of 626 cases listed for trial. However, when the term ended last Friday, after 88 days of sittings, only 83 of those cases, or 12 per cent, were disposed of, figures compiled by the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) have revealed. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.