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10 Facts About Jamaica’s Reggae Marathon

Jamaica’s Reggae Marathon has earned an international reputation as one of the world’s most well-organised and enjoyable marathons, located in one of the world’s most well-loved and culturally unique nations. From start to finish, the Reggae Marathon Event is uniquely Jamaican. It takes place annually in Negril, and is often seen as an ideal respite that offers a combination of an island vacation, a great sporting and wellness event, tons of fun, and an overall truly unforgettable experience. Here are 10 interesting facts about the marathon.

  1. The Reggae Marathon has taken place in Negril annually since 2000.
  2. Even though it is called ‘Reggae Marathon, the event actually features a marathon, a half-marathon and a 10K race.
  3. The Reggae Marathon is organised by the Jamdammers Running Club of Kingston, and has the partnership and endorsement of the Jamaica Tourist Board, The Ministry of Health, The Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association, the Negril Chapter of the Jamaica Hotel Tourist Association, and the Chamber of Commerce of Negril.
  4. The Reggae Marathon has a maximum of 3,000 participants allowed, and attracts runners from all over the world who come for the run, the fun and the sun and stay for a dip in the sea afterwards. The marathon has had runners from over 36 countries. It’s particularly perfect for those who relish the idea of a beach party for 3,000 after a long run.
  5. The race starts and finishes outside Long Bay Beach Park on Norman Manley Boulevard in Negril, Jamaica. The Marathon, Half Marathon & 10K starts at Long Bay Beach Park situated along Negril’s famed 7-mile white sand beach. The course loops into the town of Negril then heads north to Bloody Bay and returns to the finish at Long Bay Beach Park.
  6. The course is certified by the International Association of Athletics Federation (IAAF) and the Association of International Marathon and Distance Runners (AIMS), thus meeting international standards. The event is also sanctioned by the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA).
  7. Start time is usually 5:15am, and the course remains open for six hours, with the requirement that marathoners must reach the halfway mark within three hours.
  8. There are aid stations every mile – 25 in all, manned by experienced marathoners and enthusiastic volunteers. The marathon also provides cooling stations with misters and iced towel wraps, inspirational reggae music at every mile, closed lanes for runners, and medical stations and fully equipped ambulances positioned along the course and staffed by a premier multidisciplinary medical team.
  9. Each participant gets a commemorative finisher’s medal, an official Reggae Marathon T-shirt, and a finisher’s certificate.
  10. Registration for the marathon also grants participants free entry to ‘The World’s Best Pasta Party’ and the ‘Victory Beach & Awards party’. The Pasta Party normally happens on the night before the marathon, while the Victory Party (or The Finish Line Beach Bash) happens afterward, affording participants the opportunity to relax on the beach with special offerings and entertainment lined up to ensure that they have the best time.

Sources:
Reggae Marathon Website
Downloadable PDF: Reggae Marathon Fact Sheet

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Scratch CSEC?
  2. Grooming rules remain! -Schools
  3. Redeveloping Heroes Circle is to your benefit -Holness
  4. PM to decide on Montague-FLA issue
  5. World mourns Aretha Franklin
  6. Alleged gangster, mom killed

Ruel Reid

1. Scratch CSEC?

Education Minister Ruel Reid has made it clear that he would be making a strident push to shake up the educational system that he believes is over reliant on the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) from the Caribbean Examination Council (CXC), and which is preventing young people from attaining their full potential. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Grooming rules remain! -Schools

Although making it quite clear that discipline will be maintained, Dr Elaine Cunningham, who heads St Hugh’s High School in St Andrew, believes that the issue of grooming must include negotiation and compromise. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Prime Minister Andrew Holness

3. Redeveloping Heroes Circle is to your benefit -Holness

Prime Minister Andrew Holness is reassuring residents in the communities adjacent to the National Heroes Park in Kingston that the planned redevelopment of the area will be to their benefit, hence they have no reason to be concerned. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. PM to decide on Montague-FLA issue

Prime Minister Andrew Holness says that he has been receiving updates on the controversy surrounding former Minister of National Security Robert Montague’s involvement in the Firearm Licensing Authority (FLA) granting a gun licence to man who reportedly has a dubious record and who was previously denied by the agency. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. World mourns Aretha Franklin

Franklin, the glorious ‘Queen of Soul’ and genius of American song, died on Thursday morning at her home in Detroit of pancreatic cancer. She was 76. Few performers were so universally idolised by peers and critics and so exalted and yet so familiar to their fans. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Alleged gangster, mom killed

Uton ‘Bigga’ Cocket, who the police say was the leader of the much-feared Hanover-based One Voice gang, and his mother, Carlene Graver, were murdered on Wednesday at their Elgin Town home in the western parish in what is believed to be a gang-related murder. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

    1. NIF, NIS to be combined
    2. SOE pushing murder down, tourism up
    3. Man rescued after 7 days’ drifting asea
    4. Rogue principals?
    5. NEPA shoots white-tailed deer
    6. Clarendon hunters fume over land rights

1. NIF, NIS to be combined

With Cabinet approval in hand, the Ministry of Labour and Social Security disclosed on Monday that it is pursuing an overhaul of public pension fund manager National Insurance Fund (NIF) that will result in its merger with the National Insurance Scheme (NIS). See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. SOE pushing murder down, tourism up

It’s not “perfect” and an alternative is quite welcome, but the ongoing state of public emergency (SOE) in the parish of St James has been the catalyst for murders trending down, according to Winston Lawson, president of the Montego Bay Chamber of Commerce. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Man rescued after 7 days’ drifting asea

Fishermen attached to Rainforest Seafoods caught an unlikely catch at sea on Monday when an elderly fisherman was rescued after drifting for seven days. The man, known only as Okey, in his late 50s, of a Treasure Beach address, was in a horrible condition, hungry, exhausted and near death, Rainforest Seafoods’ Director of Marketing and Corporate Affairs Roger Lyn confirmed to The GleanerSee full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Rogue principals?

Members of parliament’s Constituency Development Fund Committee yesterday blasted school administrators who continued to demand the payment of auxiliary fees before students are admitted. During a special sitting of the CDF committee yesterday chairman, Everald Warmington, noted the number of projects submitted by Members of Parliament for additional funding for educational assistance and charged that the majority related to assistance with paying auxiliary fees for students going to high schools. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. NEPA says shoot white-tailed deer

The National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) last Friday gave the green light to game bird hunters to legally hunt the white-tailed deer that is wreaking havoc on crops in Portland and elsewhere. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Clarendon hunters fume over land rights

Trouble is brewing ahead of Saturday’s official start to the 2018 game bird hunting season, which runs until Sunday, September 23, as businessman Authnel Reid of Portland Bight, Clarendon, served notice last Friday that registered hunters like himself who are not aligned to any gun clubs would not allow themselves to be intimidated by outsiders who claim to lease property in the area during the annual bird-shooting season. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Sleeveless ban in tact in Charles’ house
  2. J’can peppers wanted in Canada
  3. Weir, Minzie quit Racers Track Club
  4. Jamaican Teas is HAACP certified
  5. Ja to host CARICOM seminar
  6. Possible mass Venezuelan migration to Ja?

Pearnel Charles

1. Sleeveless ban in tact in Charles’ house

Speaker of the House, Pearnel Charles Sr, has made it clear that despite the suspension of the no-sleeveless policy for government buildings there will be no changes to the operations at Gordon House until he is guided by the Standing Orders. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. J’can peppers wanted in Canada

A call is being made for local producers, particularly those who supply peppers, to engage more with the overseas market in order for there to be greater collaboration and growth in the economy. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Weir, Minzie quit Racers Track Club

Veteran athletics coach Glen Mills confirmed to The Gleaner yesterday that Olympic bronze medallist Warren Weir and Jevaughn Minzie will not be under his tutelage when training for the 2019 athletics season begins in the fall. Mills, who is the founder of Racers Track Club, said that Weir informed him last week that he intends to leave the island and continue his training overseas, as he is no longer comfortable living in Jamaica. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Jamaican Teas is HAACP certified

Jamaican Teas Limited has been awarded the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) Certification, which is the internationally recognised risk-based system for managing food safety. It provides the general principles of food hygiene from primary production through final consumption, highlighting key hygiene controls at each stage. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Ja to host CARICOM seminar

A three-day sensitisation seminar on the CARICOM Results Based Management (RBM) System will be held in Jamaica starting today and ending on Thursday. The seminar opens at 9 a.m. at the Office of the Prime Minister, where a discussion will be held with permanent secretaries of the ministries, departments, and agencies. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Possible mass Venezuelan migration to Ja?

Sustainable Development Professor Anthony Clayton believes that Jamaicans must concern themselves with the political and economic turmoil devastating Venezuela, warning of possible mass migration into the island. In an interview with The Gleaner, Clayton highlighted that Venezuela’s severing of ties with democracy must be taken seriously. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. IDB bats for NIDS
  2. Replace Wheatley or shut it down – PNP to Holness
  3. JCC endorses Ja Survey of Establishments
  4. Dress police fired
  5. Copa, Go Jamaica team up
  6. Byles urges better paying jobs for J’cans in emerging sectors

1. IDB bats for NIDS

Luis Alberto Moreno, president of the Inter-American Development Bank, is urging Jamaicans to embrace the planned National Identification System (NIDS), which is facing some public pushback and a constitutional challenge. The IDB has provided a loan of US$68 million for the rollout of the NIDS over a three-year period, with a pilot project for civil servants expected to get under way in January 2019. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Prime Minister Andrew Holness

2. Replace Wheatley or shut it down – PNP to Holness

Opposition Leader Dr Peter Phillips has told Prime Minister Andrew Holness to shut down his administration if he is unable to find a competent minister to replace Dr Andrew Wheatley at the Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It has been more than two weeks since Wheatley resigned as minister amid a scandal at the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica (Petrojam) and other agencies under his portfolio. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. JCC endorses Ja Survey of Establishments

The Jamaica Chamber of Commerce’s (JCC) vision of supporting Jamaica’s growth by facilitating its members’ integration into the global economy could be further enhanced by the ongoing island-wide Jamaica Survey of Establishments (JSE), reasons JCC CEO Trevor Fearon. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Cabinet dress police fired

Hours before the Office of the Prime Minister issued a release last Friday that the Cabinet had ordered the suspension of the long-standing practice of prohibiting women wearing sleeveless attire from entry into government buildings, a female reporter from The Sunday Gleaner tested the system. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Copa, Go Jamaica team up

Copa Airlines has named Go Jamaica Travel as its official travel agency in Jamaica as part of a partnership to increase movement between Jamaica and several destinations in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and Central and South America. The announcement was made by Copa representatives during a product launch at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel last Thursday. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Byles urges better paying jobs for J’cans in emerging sectors

Chairman of the Sagicor Group Richard Byles is questioning why Jamaicans are not being targeted for better paying positions in jobs that are being created in several sectors of the economy. Delivering the keynote address at Saturday night’s St Ann Homecoming and Heritage Foundation’s 13th Annual Awards Banquet at Jewel Dunn’s River in St Ann, Byles acknowledged that over the past five years, economic progress has been made but stressed that much more needs to be done to set the country on firm economic footing. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Things to Do and See in St. Elizabeth

St. Elizabeth has it all.  Fun, adventure, relaxation, a world famous bar and even a zoo!  Check out this Flair Magazine round up of what to see and do here.

Video:

Articles:

St. Elizabeth: A True Savannah But Entertainment Hub

Golden sandy beaches, rich savannahs, a spectacular safari, unblemished scenes of nature and a signature area of true love are a few breathtaking features that define the beautiful parish of St Elizabeth. It’s cool and quaint atmosphere are added factors. And its pristine attractions, whether natural or spiced with a special human touch, make it one of the best places where you can indulge in a genuine Jamaican experience. Now, here’s your custom entertainment guide. Read more about Black River Safari, Lovers Leap, Treasure Beach, The Joy Spence Appleton Estate Rum Experience and YS Falls here

The Hidden Treasure Of Floyd’s Pelican Bar

Sweet outdoor vibes, frolicking in the middle of the sea, or sipping exotic drinks while enjoying food with great flavours, are mere feats that get many of us on our feet. Read more here

Go Off The Grid In St. Elizabeth

The richest combinations of authentic Jamaican culture and vast biodiversity, fuelled by its abundantly fertile lands. St Elizabeth is the perfect place to take a break, go off the grid and be at peace while lavishing in the depths of a real appreciation for nature. Read more here

Refresh, Revive And Rejuvenate With A Shirley Steam Bath

Shirley’s Steam Bath and Massage is definitely a gem in Treasure Beach, St Elizabeth. Everything about the venue beckoned to your senses to just relax. From the beautiful stone walls to the aroma of the herbs being boiled on the coal outside to the trees and flowers all planted by owner Shirley Genus, so colourful, it was almost like the garden was enchanted. Read more here.

Also check out Krysta The Explorer: Wild Adventures of Jamaica Zoo

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Bobby boards bus, praises JUTC
  2. New trial after court tosses rape conviction
  3. Floatable greenhouse a drought solution
  4. NEPA gets tough
  5. Crowne opposes JADCO closed-door hearings
  6. Politics choking waste-to-energy industry

1. Bobby boards bus, praises JUTC

Transport Minister Robert Montague has said that the state-owned Jamaica Urban Transit Company (JUTC) is offering an exceptional service given the resources at its disposal and that the commuters, for the most part, are quite pleased. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. New trial after court tosses rape conviction

A St Mary man who was found guilty of raping a six-year-old girl has had his conviction quashed by the Court of Appeal because of errors by the judge who presided over the trial. Further, the Court of Appeal has set aside the 23-year prison sentence that was imposed on Joel Henry and ordered that he face a new trial. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Floatable greenhouse a drought solution

The Rural Agricultural Development Authority (RADA) team from St Mary captured more than a few glances with its display of a prototype for a floatable greenhouse at the recent Denbigh Agricultural, Industrial and Food Show 2018. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Cockpit Country

4. NEPA gets tough on persons who harm protected species

The National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) last week issued a warning to individuals who kill, capture or maim the island’s protected animals, noting that violators could face jail time or heavy fines. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Crowne disagrees with JADCO closed-door hearings

Sports attorney Dr Emir Crowne said that he disagrees with the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission’s (JADCO) decision to have its anti-doping hearings for athletes in breach of World Anti-Doping Agency regulations heard behind closed doors. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Politics choking waste-to-energy industry

Canadian investor Michael Mosgrove has directed blame at the Government for the slow pace at which it has moved to create profitability out of the recycling and waste-to-energy industry. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Nine road deaths on Independence weekend
  2. RGD willing to restore Anglican cleric’s marrying rights
  3. Dunn’s River fraud racket?
  4. Reggae Boy Bolt?
  5. Translators, interpreters in demand
  6. Court cases complicate FINSAC windup

1. Nine road deaths on Independence weekend

With just seven days already ticked off in the month of August, a total of nine road fatalities from crashes during the one-week period have tripled the three deaths recorded for the corresponding period last year, according to statistics compiled by the Ministry of Transport’s Road Safety Unit. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. RGD willing to restore Anglican cleric’s marrying rights

As the row between the clergy and the Registrar General’s Department (RGD) over its imposition of a mandatory registration and annual fee for marriage officers widens, the department says sorry for the way Suffragan Bishop Robert Thompson was treated last month, as he sought to register a wedding he had conducted. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Dunn’s River Falls

3. Dunn’s River fraud racket?

Concerns by members of the board of the St Ann Development Company (SADCO) about ticket revenue being generated at Dunn’s River Falls and Park have prompted a major investigation. The police Fraud Squad, Major Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Task Force, and the Office of the Auditor General are among the entities probing the case. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Reggae Boy Bolt?

Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) president, Michael Ricketts, says he has been paying close attention to the efforts of sprint legend, Usain Bolt, to make his mark as a professional football player, and that he would fully support a call-up to the national team, if the national coaching staff thinks he is good enough. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Translators, interpreters in demand

Pointing to an increased market to host international conferences in Jamaica, representatives of the Translators and Interpreters Association of Jamaica (TIA) are concerned that there are not enough qualified and competent persons to fill the demand for these services. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Court cases complicate FINSAC windup

It’s now 21 years since bailout agency Finsac was established to address problems of insolvency in the financial sector, but plans to wind up the company are hostage to unresolved court cases. The Ministry of Finance told the Financial Gleaner that it cannot deregister the Financial Sector Adjustment Company Limited until the lawsuits are resolved. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Timeline: The Heroes Circle Redevelopment Saga

In 2017, the Government of Jamaica announced that it had received an unsolicited proposal for a public-private partnership from China Construction Company, South America (CCASA) to develop a master plan that resulted in the signing of a memorandum of understanding with CCASA and the GOJ-Urban Development Corporation. The master plan, in its current form, would pave the way for construction of a new Parliament building, government ministries and a national museum. The proposal calls for the Parliament building to be sited in the centre of Heroes Park on an estimated 19.5 acres, with the museum taking up 4.2 acres. So in addition to the 15 acres already fenced off for the memorial sites, this plan effectively removes 40 acres of the 50-acre site.

Following the publicisation of the plan, and a letter expressing concern and displeasure with the plan and the way it was developed from prominent Jamaican architects and architectural groups, overwhelming responses to the redevelopment plan have been negative, and plenty of opposition has come from different segments of the island. See the timeline below.

Friday, March 10, 2017

March 29, 2018

Monday, April 30, 2018

A letter from the College of the Fellows of the Jamaica Institute of Architects expresses concerns that the master plan was to be developed and finalised by CCASA/UDC without the benefit of any public consultations; would require the demolition of the buildings that now house the ministries of finance, education, and labour and social security; and would have a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods of residents of the area.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Friday, May 11, 2018

Wednesday, May 16, 2018

Friday, May 18, 2018

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Monday, May 21, 2018

‘As citizens required to foot the bill, we have a right to answers to the following questions: Why has there been no open competitive process to ensure least-cost and best benefits? Has there been sufficient consultation with stakeholders (especially communities impacted, development professionals, etc)? Doesn’t the exclusive partnership with CCASA render them unjustifiably advantaged? Hasn’t the MOU with CCASA not put other firms, whether local, regional or international, at a competitive disadvantage, especially if as the sole designated concept designer for the project CCASA later competes for the job as developer?’, asks columnist Jeanette Calder.

Friday, May 25, 2018

Saturday, May 26, 2018

Monday, May 28, 2018

June 22, 2018

Saturday, July 21, 2018

Sunday, July 22, 2018

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Thursday, July 26, 2018

Monday, July 30, 2018

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. PM: Don’t confuse investment and growth
  2. Songwriter tops list of nat’l honourees
  3. INDECOM boss asks for social change
  4. Teen to receive badge of honour
  5. Independent Ja failing – Ashley
  6. Popular Kgn exercise spots

Prime Minister Andrew Holness

1. PM: Don’t confuse investment and growth

Investments do not necessarily automatically translate into or contribute to economic growth unless there is significant value added, Prime Minister Andrew Holness explained during his keynote address at the 66th staging of the Denbigh Agricultural, Industrial and Food Show in May Pen, Clarendon, yesterday. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Songwriter tops list of nat’l honourees

Philanthropist and inter-national superstar Harold George Bellanfanti Jr, better known as Harry Belafonte, will add membership in the Order of Merit to his list of prestigious awards as the sole new entrant at this year’s National Honours and Awards ceremony in October.  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. INDECOM boss asks for social change

Terrence Williams, head of the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM), is decrying independent Jamaica’s failure to effectively deal with the problem of crime and to provide security and justice for its people. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Teen to receive badge of honour

Learning that she will be awarded a badge of honour for gallantry is a belated birthday present for 19-year-old Selana Reid, who assisted with rescuing several wards of the State at the Walker’s Place of Safety, which was gutted by fire in January. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Independent Ja failing – Ashley

While arguing that National Hero Norman Manley was not “pre-mature” in stating that the mission of his generation was to gain self-government for Jamaica, outspoken attorney and social advocate Dr Paul Ashley says the island’s leaders have failed the “capability test”. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Popular Kgn exercise spots

Where are the best spots to go to for outdoor exercise? Mountain Spring in St Andrew and the Palisadoes Strip in Kingston were some of the most populated areas when it came to finding Jamaicans getting in a good workout as The Gleaner made its way around the Corporate Area last week. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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