6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Moravian pastor pleads guilty to sex crimes
  2. Dec 1 is Fro Friday
  3. Contractor fails to deliver 200 paid-for vehicles to police
  4. Four take plea deal offer in Portland Circuit Court
  5. New cancer treatment centre at Cornwall Regional Hospital
  6. Hanna reprimanded for wearing sleeveless dress to Parliament

1. Moravian pastor pleads guilty to sex crimes

Moravian pastor Rupert Clarke has pleaded guilty to two counts of having sexual intercourse with a person under the age of 16 years old. The complainants are both sisters. Clarke entered the guilty plea in the St Elizabeth Circuit Court today. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Davina Bennett

2. Dec 1 is Fro Friday

For some time, bloggers and social media users have sought to promote the Afro hairstyle as truly cultural, and this Friday they will be at it again to celebrate Jamaica’s Davina Bennett who, on Sunday finished third in the Miss Universe 2017 pageant wearing ‘the fro’. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Contractor fails to deliver 200 paid-for vehicles to police

A “scandalous mess” is how Parliament’s Public Administration and Appropriations Committee (PAAC) described the failure by a contractor to deliver 200 pre-owned motor vehicles to the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), having missed two deadlines despite receiving payment of more than $200 million. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Four take plea deal offer in Portland Circuit Court

Four accused persons have taken advantage of the Justice Ministry’s plea deal in the Portland Circuit Court. Just two weeks into the Michaelmas Session of the court, two persons have pleaded guilty to illegal possession of firearm, one for having sex with a minor, and one for wounding with intent. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. New cancer treatment centre for Cornwall Regional Hospital

Cancer patients in western Jamaica will now have closer treatment at hand with the latest technology on hand to treat the deadly disease, following the recent opening of a new cancer treatment centre at the Cornwall Regional Hospital (CRH) in Montego Bay. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Hanna reprimanded for wearing sleeveless dress to Parliament

St Ann South East MP Lisa Hanna set off a series of comments and criticisms on Wednesday when she turned up in parliament in a sleeveless dress. “It is attention-seeking,” said St Andrew West Rural MP Juliet Cuthbert Flynn, in an off-mic comment. Hanna was wearing a black cap sleeve with a wider scoop neckline. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Queen Davina returns home
  2. Dec 9 funeral for Lester Spaulding
  3. Ja in on multi-destination winter pull
  4. Worrying suicide trend in teens
  5. School violence falling
  6. UWI rebrands consultancy

Davina Bennett

1. Queen Davina returns home

Miss Universe second runner-up Jamaican Davina Bennett arrived at the Norman Manley International Airport yesterday to a heartfelt homecoming orchestrated by Uzuri International Designs and Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sports Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Dec 9 funeral for Lester Spaulding

The family of J.A. Lester Spaulding, chairman of the RJRGLEANER Communications Group, has advised that thanksgiving service for his life and work will be held on Saturday, December 9 at 11:00 a.m. at the Webster Memorial Church at 53 Half-Way Tree Road in St Andrew. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Ja in on multi-destination winter pull

Jamaica, along with Cuba, Dominica Republic, and Mexico are set to roll out a multi-destination offering to the international market for the 2018 winter tourist season. According to Minister of Tourism Edmund Bartlett, two-thirds of this new marketing approach has already been agreed on, with Mexico due to put pen to paper on the 17th of January 2018. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Worrying suicide trend in teens

The last 12 months have seen adolescents either considering or making plans to end their lives, and this is significantly higher among females.This was revealed in a 2017 Global School Health Survey and Rapid Situation Assessment, which was conducted by the National Council on Drug Abuse (NCDA).  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. School violence falling

Jamaica may be currently faced with disturbing and alarming incidents of crime and mayhem, but a totally different picture has been painted in schools. A study done this year by the National Council on Drug Abuse (NCDA) shows that there has been significant reduction in major incidents of violence in learning institutions. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. UWI rebrands consultancy

The University of the West Indies relaunched its business and advisory subsidiary under the new name Lumin Consulting. The company’s initial focus will be on diversifying its revenue base next year, said executive director Lisa Cummins. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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More Than An Afro Queen: Saluting Davina Bennett’s Natural Roots

Davina Bennett

‘Rooting’ for Jamaica took on new meaning at the 2017 staging of the Miss Universe Competition. By the time the pageant’s top three finalists were announced, social media had its own mini-movement going. Jamaicans, Caribbean nationals, blacks, people of African descent, and people standing in solidarity with people of black and African heritage, all took to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to herald the revolutionary face of beauty, embodied in Jamaica’s representative, Davina Bennett, who won second runner-up (third place) in the international competition. The hashtags that ruled the night were #Jamaica, #blackgirlmagic, #MissUniverse, #afro and #Davina.

It was Davina’s ‘rootsy’ hairstyle that stole the spotlight. Instead of the usual straight hair, which has been a staple to international pageants from time immemorial, the Jamaican queen opted to sport a natural, kinky Afro hair. In doing so, Davina managed to steal the spotlight, the show, and the hearts of spectators around the world. The hairstyle she wore, and her very dark skin tone, immediately represented validation for millions of natural-haired black women (and men), and struck a blow to the stereotypical, non-inclusive definition of beauty that has been popularised by mainstream media for years.

Speaking to the significance of Davina’s look on an international stage, Miss Jamaica World 2005, Terri-Karelle Reid, said, “When it comes to black beauty, black magic, black accomplishment, black image … we aren’t always portrayed in the most beautiful light. And self-doubt and self-hatred is something that resonates within the black community, especially among girls, because we do not see images that we can relate to, and that reflect our beauty. …

Davina Bennett

“What [Davina] has been able to do is to keep the conversation going and inspire a lot of little girls around the world who look like her – same colour, same natural hair – to achieve their goals and dreams and know that they’re beautiful despite what the world wants to show them or tell them. [Davina reminds us that] we are here to break those molds and tell little girls to wake up, to love themselves more.”

Terri-Karelle, who, ironically, also wore a natural Afro at her pageant, said that Davina’s triumph was particularly special for her because it represented a progression of the conversation about acceptance of the many faces of black beauty, and the need to remain true to who you are. Regarding the reactions to her hairstyle at her own pageant, Terri-Karelle said: “I am still under the impression that the very thing that some people would have had me change was the very thing that made me stand out. My mantra going into Miss Jamaica World, and my mantra even now, is to never be content with someone’s definition of you. You have to step into your greatness unapologetically, and that is what Davina did.

“I am extremely proud of her. My message to her is that sometimes you have to lose to win, and the opportunities that she will be afforded will be far greater, far more extensive in the position she’s in now than maybe if she had won. I did it 12 years ago, and I did not accomplish what she has, but there’s one similarity: the people who try to convince you that changing to suit the norm is in your best interest. My experience is that understanding yourself, and being your truest form is just the best way to show self-love. I’m happy that 12 years later, we have an Afro queen standing and representing this so clearly for us.”

On her own Instagram page, Davina posted:

The responses to her hairstyle, especially on Twitter, were unanimous:

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Grammy nomination for Chronixx, Jr Gong, Morgan Heritage
  2. INDECOM unfazed by Holness’ criticism
  3. Ja to negotiate services agreement with Dom Rep
  4. Gruesome family killing recalled by witness
  5. Accused in Mario Deane cases returns to court tomorrow
  6. Another child killed in St James

Chronixx

1. Grammy nomination for Chronixx, Jr Gong, Morgan Heritage

Chronixx, Damian ‘Jr Gong’ Marley and Morgan Heritage are the Jamaican nominees for Best Reggae Album in the 2018 Grammy Awards. Chronixx’s Chronology, Marley’s Stony Hill and Morgan Heritage’s Avrakedabra are up against Common Kings’ Lost in Paradise and J Boog’s Wash House TingSee full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. INDECOM unfazed by Holness’ criticism

Commissioner of the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM), Terrence Williams, is demanding clarity from Prime Minister Andrew Holness for a statement he made on Sunday at the Jamaica Labour Party’s 74th annual conference at the National Arena, where he suggested that the agency demoralises members of the police force by their overzealous manner of conducting investigations. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Holness

3. Ja to negotiate services agreement with Dom Rep

Prime Minister Andrew Holness has said a new air services agreement is to be negotiated between Jamaica and the Dominican Republic to complement a soon-to-be-signed Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on multi-destination tourism. Holness made the declaration during his press briefing at the Office of the Prime Minister this afternoon after meeting with President of the Dominican Republic, Danilo Medina Sanchez to discuss bilateral, regional and multilateral issues. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Gruesome family killing recalled by witness

A frail, elderly father yesterday gave evidence detailing how a St Ann woman, her husband and their three children cornered his mentally ill son inside a house in the parish and chopped him repeatedly until he died, before using a piece of rope to drag his body into the streets. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Accused in Mario Dean case returns to court tomorrow

Marvin Orr and Adrian Morgan, the inmates charged with murder in connection with the death of Mario Deane, who died from a brutal beating sustained while in police custody in 2013, will make their next appearance in the St James Circuit Court on November 29. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Another child killed in St James

The killing of yet another child has lifted the spine-chilling murder count in St James to 296 since the start of the year, leaving many residents paralysed with fear as it would appear that the police are powerless to stop the marauding gangsters, who continue their rampage with impunity. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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Remembering Dr Claude Packer: Consummate Educator

Jamaica lost one of its greatest and most iconic educators with the passing of Dr Claude Packer. Most well-known for his stellar contribution to the Mico College University, and his strong opinions of mathematics and male education in the island, Dr Packer died on Thursday, November 23, 2017. As the education community mourns the passing of a veritable titan, diGJamaica takes a moment to highlight some of his many accomplishments, and also recall times when he was featured in The Gleaner newspaper.

  1. Dr Packer worked in education for more than 50 years before his retirement in 2014. He became principal of the (then) Mico Teachers’ College in 1995 and was appointed first president when they upgraded to a university college in 2009.
  2. His own educational background was impressive and clearly portrayed the level of excellence he pursued:
    – The Mico University College graduate
    – The University of the West Indies: B.A. (Hons) Mathematics
    – Central Connecticut State University: M.Sc. Mathematics Education
    – Cornell University: Master’s and Doctor of Philosophy, Mathematics
    – Harvard University: postgraduate diploma, Systems Thinking
  3. Before his time at The Mico, he worked with several other prestigious educational institutions:
    – He served as Head of the Department of Economics at the University of the West Indies
    – He served as adjunct faculty member of the Indira Gandhi National Open University, India
    – He served as adjunct faculty member of Nova Southeastern, United States
  4. He was well-known for his mathematical acumen. He was a math lecturer in the Faculty of Education at the University of the West Indies, Mona and Cornell University. He was also an external examiner for Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) mathematics.
  5. He was played a key role in the development of the Caribbean Centre of Excellence in Mathematics, a body that pays particular attention to studying and improving how mathematics is taught in schools.
  6. He received many awards for his work in education. These include:
    – the Silver Musgrave Medal in 1997 for contribution to mathematics education in Jamaica
    – the Governor General’s Achievement Award in 2003
    – the Mico Gold Medal for Excellence in 2007
  7. He also received awards at the national level, chief among which was the national honour at the level of Commander of the Order of Distinction, conferred in 2008.

Appearances in The Gleaner

As a key figure in tertiary education in Jamaica, and a vocal proponent for closer attention to mathematics and how males are educated, Dr Packer was regularly featured in The Gleaner newspaper. Here are some of those articles (these can be sourced by contacting the Gleaner Library at 922-3400):

Claude Packer: Master teacher

Published 1998

Mico University College first president appointment ad

Published Sun, June 29, 2008

More males needed in classrooms

Published Wed, May 11, 2011

Local teacher-students behind
counterparts on math concepts

Published Sun, Sept 15, 2013

 

Sources:
Professor Claude Packer Is Dead
The Mico University College Appointments
The Gleaner Newspaper Archives

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Jamaica places third in Miss Universe competition
  2. Holness calls himself ‘The Builder’
  3. ZIK-V, Chik-V still concerns
  4. NHT on track to deliver 8,500 mortgages
  5. PM calls for support for law denying murder-accused of bail
  6. Lignum Vitae awards for Ellis, Williams

Davina Bennett

1. Jamaica places third in Miss Universe competition

Miss Universe Jamaica Davina Bennett has been declared second runner up to the 2017 Miss Universe. Bennett, emerged from a field of 92 contestants from across the globe. Miss South Africa Demi-Leigh Nel-Peters was declared the winner and Miss Colombia Laura González Ospina, first runner up. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Holness calls himself ‘The Builder’

Describing himself as “the builder”, Prime Minister Andrew Holness yesterday declared that his administration was on track this fiscal year to deliver 8,500 mortgages to new homeowners – a new record in the National Housing Trust’s 40-year history. The loans, said Holness, convert to $28 billion. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

An Aedes aegypti mosquito is shown on human skin.

3. ZIK-V, Chik-V still concerns

Dr Winston De La Haye, chief medical officer in the Ministry of Health, has signalled that there is a lull in Zika (Zik V) and Chikungunya virus (chik-V) cases but cautioned against complacency, indicating that both illnesses are here to stay. In an interview with The Gleaner on the weekend, De La Haye said that it is important that citizens keep abreast of what is happening. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. NHT on track to deliver 8,500 mortgages

Prime Minister Andrew Holness has said that the National Housing Trust (NHT) is on track to deliver 8,500 mortgages to new home owners. He was speaking on Sunday at the Jamaica Labour Party’s Annual Conference at the National Arena. Holness said the 8,500 mortgages would equate to about $28 billion. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Holness

5. PM calls for support for law denying murder-accused of bail

Prime Minister Andrew Holness says advocates of justice should support the passage of laws that seek to deny bail to persons accused of murder or caught with an illegal weapon. Mr Holness told Labourites who gathered at the party’s annual conference at the National Arena in Kingston this afternoon that it pained his heart to see the many Jamaicans mourning the lives of relatives who have been murdered. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Lignum Vitae awards for Ellis, Williams

Last Friday at the National Gallery of Jamaica, Kingston, two out of three prizes were announced for the 2017 Lignum Vitae Writing Awards. There are three categories in the awards: the Una Marson Prize, awarded for adult fiction or adult creative non-fiction, worth $500,000; the Vic Reid Prize, awarded for young adult fiction, worth $250,000; and the Jean D’Costa Prize, awarded for children’s fiction, worth $250,000. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. MoBay business pauses after flooding
  2. Gov’t pledges emergency funds for MoBay
  3. Professor Claude packer is dead
  4. Twelve shot in St James, four fatally
  5. Gov’t signs loan agreement for energy management programme
  6. Six undocumented Jamaicans arrested in The Bahamas

1. MoBay businesses pause after flooding

Commercial activities in Montego Bay are at a standstill following Wednesday’s heavy rains. On Thursday, several major business operations in downtown Montego Bay were assessing damage, with employees feverishly removing silt from the properties. Business activity was almost non-existent along the usually busy Harbour Street as huge trucks collected debris from the flood waters. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Gov’t pledges emergency funds for MoBay

Local Government Minister Desmond McKenzie has announced that $20 million has so far been identified to help with clean up and recovery in Montego Bay, St James following Wednesday’s flood damage to sections of the western city. McKenzie says $10 million will be made available from the Equalisation Fund. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Professor Claude packer is dead

Professor Claude Packer, the first president of the Mico University College, has died. News reaching The Gleaner is that Packer died at 6:10 p.m. yesterday at his daughter’s home in Florida, United States. He had been ailing for some time. Packer served the education sector for more than 50 years before retiring in 2014. He became principal of Mico Teachers’ College in 1995 and was later appointed the first president when the teachers’ college transitioned into the Mico University College in 2009. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Twelve shot in St James, four fatally

It was a night of terror in St James last night as another 12 people were shot, four fatally. The incidents began in Granville, where seven persons were wounded as gunmen went on a 30-minute shooting spree. Two of those wounded later died. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Gov’t signs loan agreement for energy management programme

The Government has signed a US$15-million loan agreement with the Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA) for the implementation of the Energy Management and Efficiency Programme (EMEP). Minister of Finance and the Public Service, Audley Shaw says that the sum is the second portion of a joint loan of US$30 million for the roll-out of the EMEP. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Six undocumented Jamaicans arrested in The Bahamas

Six undocumented Jamaican migrants have been arrested in Bimini in The Bahamas. It’s reported that the authorities went to Cat Cay and held the six Jamaicans in bushes shortly after 10 o’clock, Wednesday morning. A Bahamian man was also arrested in connection with the matter. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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Jamaican Proverbs That Speak To The Elements

Jamaican proverbs hold a special place in our hearts. They represent the continuation of the oral history of our nation, a summation of the stories and lessons of our forefathers in a few succinct, witty lines. Nothing thrills us like hearing the words of our ancestors in our native tongue, passing along wisdom – sometimes with a heavy dose of humour – to the next generation. Here are some Jamaican proverbs speaking to the elements of fire and water.

Fire

Fire deh a muss muss tail, him tink a cool breeze.
Translation: When fire is at muss-muss’ (a fictional creature) tail, he thinks it is cool breeze.

Wen visitor come a we fireside, we mek we pot smell sweet.
Translation: When visitors come to our fireside, we ensure that our pots smell sweet.

Pudden cyaan bake widout fire.
Translation: A pudding cannot be baked without fire.

Yuh cyan tek mout-water so out fire.
Translation: You cannot use mouthwater to put out a fire just so.

 

Water

Dutty water can put out fire.
Translation: Dirty waters can put out a fire.

When water trow weh, it cyaan pick up back.
Translation: When water is thrown away, it cannot be picked up back.

Rock stone a ribba bottom never see sun hot.
Translation: The rockstone at the bottom of the river never sees the heat of the sun.

Every fish eena sea nuh shark.
Translation: Not every fish in the sea is a shark.

Sun bun washer woman, but it dry her wet clothes.
Translation: The sun may burn the washerwoman, but it will also dry her wet clothes.

Drought time hard pon mawga cane, but it never too late fi a shower a rain.
Translation: Times of drought are difficult for a meager dog, but it is never too late to get a shower of rain.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. MoBay flooding affects schools
  2. Flash flood warning extended to more parishes
  3. PNP awaiting Integrity Commission’s review of OCG report
  4. JET exec welcomes Cockpit Country move
  5. JC-STATHS final for Manning Cup
  6. First Starbucks store opens in MoBay

1. MoBay flooding affects schools

The Ministry of Education has advised that schools in the Montego Bay area affected by severe flooding yesterday should remain closed. Education Minister Ruel Reid has advised parents and school administrators to continue paying close attention to releases from the Met Service and assess where it is safe for children and adults to use the roadways. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Flash flood warning extended to more parishes

The Meteorological Service has extended the Flash Flood Warning for low-lying and flood-prone areas of Hanover, St James, Westmoreland, and St Elizabeth until 5 this afternoon. The Flash Flood Watch for low-lying and flood-prone areas of St Ann, Trelawny, Manchester, Clarendon, St Catherine, St Mary, Portland, St Thomas, Kingston and St Andrew  has also been extended until that time. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. PNP awaiting Integrity Commission’s review of OCG report

The People’s National Party (PNP) Integrity Commission is expected, within a few weeks, to respond to general secretary Julian Robinson on the way forward following Tuesday’s tabling of the contractor general’s special report on allegations of impropriety in the St Ann South East constituency and the parish’s municipal corporation. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Diana McCaulay

4. JET exec welcomes Cockpit Country move

Chief executive officer of the Jamaica Environment Trust (JET) Diana McCauley has welcomed the move by the government to declare the Cockpit Country a no-mining zone. However, the environmentalist says there are still concerns about some boundaries which were not included in Prime Minister, Andrew Holness’ announcement yesterday.  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. JC-STATHS final for Manning Cup

Defending champions Jamaica College (JC) and St Andrew Technical High School (STATHS) will meet in this year’s ISSA/FLOW Manning Cup final following contrasting semi-final victories at the National Stadium last evening. JC produced their usual gritty performance to carve out a hard-fought 3-2 extra-time victory over Holy Trinity High, this after both teams played out a 1-1 draw in full time. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. First Starbucks store opens in MoBay

Caribbean Coffee Baristas Limited, led by Ian Dear and Adam Stewart, opened its first Starbucks store in Jamaica on Tuesday and is expected to launch 14 more in five years. Jamaica becomes the American coffee chain’s 76th market. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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Remember Lester: Recalling Lester Spaulding’s Legendary Life

The news that Joseph Aloysius Lester Spaulding, 76, passed away on the afternoon of Friday, November 17, 2017, at the Andrews Memorial Hospital after battling illness, sent shock waves of sadness across the Caribbean media landscape. He was known as a giant in the field, earning respect as a general and veteran who worked tirelessly in media to establish the prominence of what is perhaps Jamaica’s largest media house, RJR Gleaner Communications Group. Here are some noteworthy memories of Lester Spaulding’s legendary life.

Early life

He was born in Kingston on April 1, 1941, and started formal education at the Half-Way Tree Primary School. After this, he attended Kingston College, a traditional all-boys’ high school, then went to the College of Arts, Science and Technology (CAST), since renamed the College of Science and Education (CASE).

Work life

After working at PricewaterhouseCoopers between 1959  and 1964, Spaulding’s long history of contribution to Jamaica and the Caribbean media began with his first job in media at Radio Jamaica. He grew from an accountant to become the company’s CEO and chairman. He was hired as chief clerk in 1965, and held that post for three years, until 1968. In 1969, he rose to the rank of chief accountant, and maintained that post until 1977.

In  1978, Spaulding made history as the first Jamaican native to be hired as managing director of Radio Jamaica – a title he retained until 2008. He was also appointed chairman of the RJR Group in 1994, and kept the post from 1995 to 2016, at which time the merger between the RJR Communications Group and The Gleaner (Media) Company Ltd took place. After that, up until the time of his death, he was chairman of the RJRGLEANER Communications Group. He was due to retire at the end of November 2017.

His contribution to Caribbean media over the span of his working life was epic. According to Gary Allen, among other things, Spaulding “presided over Television Jamaica becoming the first digital television facility in the Caribbean, and he was very much involved in the current transition to high-definition television”.

Other work responsibilities

Spaulding served as a board member of Caribbean Media Corporation (CMC), Caribbean News Agency (CANA), National Crime Prevention Fund (CRIMESTOP), PALS Jamaica Limited, Guardsman Communications Limited and GV Media Group in London. He was president  of the Caribbean Broadcasting Union between 1987 and 1991, and was also a director of the Caribbean News Agency and the first chairman of the Caribbean Media Corporation.

He was a founding member of the National Crime Prevention Fund, more commonly known as Crime Stop Jamaica. After being appointed co-chair of Crime Stop at the launch in 1989, he assumed the chairmanship in March of 1993, a position he held for seven years. Then, he rescinded the chairmanship and took on the deputy chairman role until he resigned from the Board in 2013.

Spaulding served on several boards of directors for many companies, including LASCO Manufacturing; LASCO Distributors; Peace and Love in Schools; the Caribbean Community of Retired Persons; Guardsman Communications; the Private Security Regulations Authority; Jamaica National Money Services; the Scottish Masonic Association; the St Andrew Justice of the Peace and Lay Magistrates’ Association; the National Crime Prevention Fund; Clearchannel Communications Limited; the Gleaner/Voice Group in London, and Salada Foods Jamaica.

Honours and awards:
Order of Distinction, Commander Class
Advertising Agencies Association of Jamaica’s Millennium Man Award
Caribbean Media Corporation Award of Excellence for Leadership
Caribbean Peer Awards lifetime Achievement Award

Sources:
The Gleaner: Goodbye to a Legend – Death of RJR Gleaner Chairman Lester Spaulding Shocks Media Fraternity
The Gleaner: Editorial – Lester Spaulding’s Big Vision
The Gleaner: PAJ Pays Tribute To Lester Spaulding
The Gleaner: RJRGLEANER Group Chairman Lester Spaulding Dies

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