6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. #London2017: Blake bitterly disappointed
  2. Ja athletics in trouble?
  3. JCF urged to withdraw Tivoli report
  4. Three fishermen missing after boat capsizes
  5. Patrick Powell sentence serves as caution
  6. Int’l acts for poetry festival

1. #London2017: Blake bitterly disappointed

A fourth-place finish in the 100 metres final and failure to advance to the 200m final. It was supposed to be a much better 2017 World Championship for Yohan Blake. That’s his conviction, and last night’s third-place finish in his 200m semi-final inside the London Stadium in 20.52 seconds has left the 2011 World 100m champion and second fastest man in the world, over both the 100m and 200m, bitterly disappointed. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Ja athletics in trouble?

“Yes, Jamaican sprinting has a problem.” Yohan Blake’s assessment did not require any Sherlock Holmes-style sleuthing. His own performance in the men’s 200m semi-final and the fact that Jamaica will, for the first time in the World Championships since 2005, not have a men’s 200m finalist seemed like a pretty clear indication. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. JCF urged to withdraw Tivoli report

Attorney General Marlene Malahoo Forte will now be called on to make a pronouncement on the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) review, which has cleared its members of wrongdoing, in the 2010 operation in Tivoli Gardens. Public Defender Arlene Harrison Henry says that the report is “contemptuous” of the enquiry into the events, and the Government should demand its withdrawal. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Three fishermen missing after boat capsizes

The police are treating as a missing persons case, Tuesday night’s disappearance of three fishermen, who were part of a four-man team. The four men went over board after their eight-foot, fibre-glass vessel capsized while fishing between Pedro Cays and Rocky Point. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Patrick Powell sentence serves as caution

Paula Llewellyn, the nation’s chief prosecutor, has declared that the prison sentence handed to businessman Patrick Powell should serve as warning to other license firearm holders. Powell was given a nine-month prison sentence, at hard labour, by Parish Judge Vaughn Smith yesterday following his conviction last month for failing to hand over his licensed Glock pistol and ammunition to police investigators. The offence is a breach of the Firearm Act. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Int’l acts for poetry festival

The highly anticipated Jamaica Poetry Festival – The Feast of Poetree, unveils it’s seventh annual staging on August 13 at the Louise Bennett Garden Theatre, in Kingston. The festival is being presented by SenYAcum Edutainment in Association with JCDC and features local and international acts from USA and Africa. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

What is Hard Labour – Straight from Jamaica’s Lawbooks

You may have seen or heard of an accused person being sentenced to ‘hard labour’ by a judge in a courtroom setting. But, as is often the case, you may not have ever stopped to query what that means. In a practical sense, what is this ‘hard labour’ to which Jamaican prisoners are sentenced? What are they required to do; where do they go to do it; and who determines that this labour they are engaging in is ‘hard’ enough to fit the crime they have been accused of?

Below, we have found the passage in Jamaica’s laws speaking specifically to how ‘hard labour’ is administered in Jamaica’s correctional facilities.

THE CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION (ADULT CORRECTIONAL CENTRE) RULES, 1991

Employment
153.4 (1) Every inmate sentenced to imprisonment at hard labour shall, unless excused by the medical officer on medical grounds, be employed on such class of labour specified in rule 154 as the Superintendent may direct.
(2) No inmate shall be employed on any class of labour unless he has been certified by the medical officer as fit for that class of labour.
(3) No inmate required to work in an adult correctional centre shall be employed for more than eight hours a day, and arrangements shall, so far as practicable, be made for every inmate to work for at least six hours outside his cell.

154. Labour shall be divided into the following classes:

CLASS I – Trades, domestic or other adult correctional centre duties and hard bodily labour, as may from time to time be appointed.
CLASS II – Males: Sedentary or less hard bodily labour, as may from time to time be appointed. Females: Laundry, sewing, sweeping, cleaning and such other employment as may be approved by the Commissioner.
CLASS III – Males and Females: Light occupation in accordance with directions of the medical officer.

155.4 (1) No inmate shall be employed on any work which has not been authorized by the Commissioner.
(2) No inmate shall, except with the authority of the Commissioner or in pursuance of special rules, be employed in the service of, or for the private benefit of, any person.
(3) No inmate shall be employed in any capacity carrying with it disciplinary powers.

156. Arrangements shall be made for the avoidance of all unnecessary work by inmates on public holidays, and by inmates of the Christian Religion on Sunday, Christmas Day, and Good Friday, and by inmates of other religions on their recognized days of religious observance.

157. (1) The Superintendent may, where he considers it desirable for the maintenance of good order or discipline or in the interests of an inmate. direct that such inmate shall, for such time as he thinks fit, be employed in his cell and not in association with other inmates.
(2) Any direction made in accordance with the provisions of paragraph (1) shall be revoked if the medical officer so advises.


In a news article with RJR News, Commissioner of Jamaica’s Department of Corrections, Ina Turner, shed light on the types of work inmates may be required to do as hard labour:

“She cited the St Catherine Adult Correctional Centre where inmates  make uniforms for their colleagues and staff  members, bake bread, provide sanitation and maintenance services as well as repair motor vehicles. Hunter explained that at the Tamarind Farm Facility, inmates refurbished a dormitory and participated in construction projects. She also disclosed that callaloo grown by inmates plus eggs from the chicken farm are served weekly at the institutions.”
Posted in #diGDebate, About Jamaica, Crime and Security, General Information, Jamaica Tagged with: , , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. #London2017: More medals to come, says Quarrie
  2. Zimbabwe residents hurl questions at Michelle Moulton’s mother
  3. JCF review clears accused cops
  4. Nine Mandeville restaurants ordered closed
  5. Almost 900 murders on 8 months
  6. Pastor on the run after accusations of sex with minor

1. #London2017: More medals to come, says Quarrie

After recovering from an early stumble in her 200m heats to book her spot in the semi-final at the World Championships in London, young sprinter Sashalee Forbes was asked a question that has been making the rounds in the English capital. Was she and the other youngsters really capable to help drive Jamaica’s sprinting forward when the ‘Sprint Capital’ of the world was under threat to miss out on a 100m or 200m gold medal at a major international championships for the first time since the 2005 World Championships in Helsinki? See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Zimbabwe residents hurl questions at Michelle Moulton’s mother

Serious about safeguarding the reputation of their community, residents of Arnett Gardens – particularly from an area called Zimbabwe, where 17-year-old Meadowbrook High School student Micholle Moulton was shot and killed – have rebuffed reports that she was killed by someone in the community with whom she refused to have sexual relations with. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. JCF review clears accused cops

The integrity of the West Kingston Commission of Enquiry is being questioned in a Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) review that has cleared five cops of wrongdoing in the 2010 security operation in Tivoli Gardens. The enquiry’s commissioners last year recommended that Donovan Graham, Winchroy Budhoo, Everton Tabannah, Steve Waugh, and Mario Pratt not be involved in internal security plans and implementation. Budhoo died in May. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Nine Mandeville restaurants ordered closed

The Manchester Public Health Department has ordered closed a total of nine food establishments in the parish between last week and yesterday as they were deemed to be putting the public at risk. Among those closed are all five located at the Manchester Shopping Centre Food Court, which was being shut down for the second time in the last three years. Two restaurants situated at the popular Super Plus Centre Food Court have also been closed, along with two others within the parish’s capital. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Almost 900 murders in eight months

Jamaica is on the verge of recording 900 murders this year, with more than four months still remaining. Since January 1, according to statistics compiled by the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), 891 persons have been killed across the island, 158, or 21 per cent, more than for the corresponding period last year. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Pastor on the run after accusations of sex with minor

A Kingston pastor accused of repeatedly having sex with a 12-year-old girl before impregnating her is now being sought by detectives at the Centre for the Investigation of Sexual Offences and Child Abuse (CISOCA). Law-enforcement sources revealed that the girl, who is now 14 years old, has given a detailed statement alleging that the 52-year-old clergyman first forced himself on to her before he began to reward her after their sexual encounters. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

Out of Many, One People: Jamaica’s Rich Chinese Heritage

The winning costume group parading at Jamaica’s 1972 Grand Gala at the National Stadium. The group, formed by the Chinese Benevolent Society, depicted aspects of Chinese culture – a part of Jamaica’s rich heritage. (Gleaner Archives photo)

Once upon a time, Jamaica had an influx of Chinese that caused so much unrest among natives, that the Government implemented quota restrictions on Chinese immigrants. The Chinese who were already here – about 4,000 by the mid-1920s and 6,000 by 1930 – had to suffer through ill-will to ward their many businesses, which included  laundries, restaurants, bakeries and retail groceries. During the 1930s labour riots, their stores were robbed and looted. According to Dr Rebecca Tortello:

 “This decree stood until 1947 when the Chinese consulate (established in the 1920s and largely supported by the Jamaican-Chinese community) in Kingston succeeded in persuading the Jamaican Government to relax these restrictions, remove the quota system that had been placed on wives and children and parents and allow Chinese immigrants to send for their family members.”

Long before this happened, however, the Chinese arrived in Jamaica in the mid-19th century, during a time when labourers were required for the building of a railroad from Panama City to Colon, and when the excitement of the gold rush in California, America, offered promises of better opportunities and a higher quality of life. The first large group came to Jamaica from Hong Kong on July 30, 1854 to work as indentured labourers. Later, when yellow fever broke out in Panama, Chinese workers demanded to leave the country, and Panamanian authorities sent them to Jamaica – because of the close geographical proximity. They arrived in ships in exchange for Jamaican labourers. Not many of them survived.

One of them, Robert Jackson-Chin, was a trailblazer for what most Chinese are known for in Jamaica today. He opened a wholesale house in downtown Kingston, and soon, other Chinese opened stores nearby. They helped other Chinese immigrants to come to Jamaica and do likewise.

Defining Jamaican staples

As more Chinese arrived in Jamaican from Trinidad and British Guiana to work as indentured labourers on contracts, they started setting up small shops and offering a unique brand of service which can actually be credited for defining some of the most common Jamaican food staples today. Dr Rebecca Costello says: “By this time, Chinese grocers were becoming known for extending credit to favoured customers, selling by barter, providing round-the-clock service and selling goods in small, affordable quantities. It is as a result of their importation activities that items such as rice, saltfish, saltmeats, flour and cornmeal became staples of the Jamaican diet.”

By the end of the 1860s, Downtown became known as Chinatown because of the proliferation of Chinese businesses in the area. As more Chinese came to the island as labourers, and as more businesses emerged, the Jamaican business community became unsettled and lobbied the Government to impose new restrictions on Chinese immigration – a plea to which the Government conceded in 1905 when they required immigrants to register with the authorities and provide a guarantee from a reliable person as to the soundness of their characters. Harsher restrictions were imposed in 1910, when new immigrants had to pay 30 pounds upon landing and also pass a physical and a test showing that they could write and speak 50 words in three different languages.

Despite these restrictions, Chinese presence and the Chinese community in Jamaica has continued to grow. In 1891, Chin Tung-Kao founded the Chinese Benevolent Society with the aim of “offering humanitarian and social aid, as well as protecting Chinese customs and preserving their ethnic identity”. At Jamaica’s Independence Grand Gala in 1972, the Society won the costume group parade for costumes that depicted the history and heritage of Jamaican-Chinese, proving that the Chinese are now a bona fide part of Jamaican life and culture, adding to the mix and meaning of our motto, ‘Out of Many, One People’.

Source: Jamaica Gleaner Pieces of the Puzzle: The Arrival of The Chinese

Posted in #diGoftheday, Diaspora, Heritage, History, Jamaica, Observances Tagged with: , , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. McLeod hurdles to gold
  2. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce announces Zyon’s birth
  3. Warren Weir retiring from athletics
  4. Denbigh 65 honours outstanding athletes
  5. St Andrew High claims misleading, says Reid
  6. Probe ordered into Sav-La-Mar Hospital children’s ward

Omar McLeod

1. McLeod hurdles to gold

Moments after adding the World 110m hurdles title to the Olympic crown he won in Rio last year, Omar McLeod not only dedicated his win to Usain Bolt’s legacy, but also noted that he is already thinking about next season’s challenges – the 100m and 200m. See the full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce announces Zyon’s birth

Iconic Jamaican sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has announced the birth of her son Zyon Pryce. Fraser-Pryce, the multiple Olympic and World Championships gold medal winner made the disclosure on her Facebook page on Tuesday. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Warren Weir retiring from athletics

Warren Weir has apparently brought an end to his athletic career after failing to advance from the heats of the 200m at the World Championships in London. The 2012 Olympic bronze and 2013 World Championships silver medal winner could only manage a 20.60 clocking in his first round contest, which left him in fourth spot and out of the qualifying places for the semi-finals. See the full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Denbigh 65 honours outstanding athletes

On Sunday, at the 65th staging of the Denbigh Agricultural Show in Clarendon, 65 outstanding farmers from across the island were honoured for their achievements. President of the Jamaica Agricultural Society (JAS), Norman Grant, said it was all about saluting the farmers for their tremendous contribution to the development of Jamaica. See the full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Ruel Reid

5. St Andrew High claims misleading, says Reid

The Ministry of Education,Youth and Information has described a release issued by the St Andrew High School for Girls as ‘misleading in a number of areas’. The girls’ school was one of the schools Education Minister Ruel Reid declared as being extortionists and corrupt, while addressing a post-Cabinet press briefing at Jamaica House in St Andrew, recently.  See the full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Probe ordered into Sav-La-Mar Hospital children’s ward

Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton has described as troubling a video and images circulating on Facebook of construction work being done at the Savanna-la-Mar Hospital’s paediatric ward while being occupied by children. Tufton noted that under no circumstance should the children in the hospital’s care have been subjected to such conditions. See the full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

Bronze is the New Gold: Usain Bolt’s Legacy Still Intact

No one could have predicted it. Or, rather, no one would have even dared. For to suggest that Usain Bolt—sprint king, legend, god amongst men—would fail to defend his 100m crown in his last individual race on the international stage would have been viewed by track fans around the world as some form of blasphemy. But that is exactly what happened on Saturday evening as the big man laboured to the finish line after a terrible start behind long-time rival and villain of the story, Justin Gatlin, and the new kid on the block who might just be his heir apparent, Christian Coleman. The venerable Usain Bolt, previously impervious to defeat, had ended his individual career not with a bang, but a bronze.

And we were hurt. And disappointed. And hate rained down from many upon Gatlin’s head. And some wondered whether Bolt did himself and his legacy a disservice by not ending his career after his triple gold finish at the Rio Olympics last year. After all, isn’t it best to go out as a champion, with your name still at the top? Sure, it would have been nice to see him win and crown himself in golden glory one last time, for the culture. But can a ‘mere’ bronze medal tarnish the legacy Bolt has built since he was 15 years old? Absolutely not.

Let’s take a little trip down memory lane, shall we, to see how the legend of Usain St Leo Bolt of Sherwood Content, Trelawny, came to be.

The lanky youth from William Knibb Memorial High School first came to international attention in 2002, when he won the 200m title at the World Junior Championships held at our very own National Stadium. At 15 years, 332 days old, Bolt became the youngest person to win a World Junior Championships title at the time. A year later, he broke the junior 200m record at the World Youth Championships in Sherbrooke, Canada, clocking 20.40 seconds.

Over the course of his junior years, he racked up victory after victory, record after record at our own Boys and Girls Champs, the CARIFTA Games, and more. In fact, he became the first junior to run the 200m under 20 seconds—19.93—at the 2004 CARIFTA Games held in Hamilton, Bermuda. He still holds that (world under-20) record today, as well as the the world under-18 record for the 200m—20.13 seconds, set at the Pan-American Junior Championships held in Bridgetown, Barbados in July 2003. How’s that for legendary?

Bolt’s transition to the senior ranks came at the 2005 World Championships in Helsinki, Finland. At 18 years, 355 days old, he became the youngest ever finalist for the men’s 200m. But it was not the debut he would have wanted, as he pulled a muscle and finished last. The winner? Justin Gatlin. Poetic, no? Two years later, Bolt made good on the promise of his junior days when he took silver behind Tyson Gay in the same event. Those two events, plus last week’s 100m final, mark the only three times he has ever been bested in a solo international final. Ever. How’s that for legendary?

And we all know how the story played out from May 2008 onwards, when his lanky 6’5” frame first rearranged the laws of physics and sprinting to break the 100m world record at the the Reebok Grand Prix in New York, USA. Almost three months later, he would do it again at the Beijing Olympics, this time while coasting and beating his chest, his shoelaces untied. He was more reserved in the 200m final, his pet event, and again, rewrote history. He is the only sprinter to win the triple double—100m and 200m titles—at three consecutive Olympics (2008, 2012 and 2016), and certainly the first to ‘triple triple,’ but for the unfortunate loss of the 2008 relay gold due to teammate Nesta Carter’s retroactive disqualification for a doping offence. How’s that for legendary?

Overall, Bolt has amassed 29 international medals over the course of a stellar 15-year career. Twenty-three of those medals are gold, five silver, and one bronze. He has 14 senior World Champs medals, 11 of them gold, making him the most successful athlete in World Champs history—also the first to win the triple double at the competition. He is one of only nine athletes to win world championship titles at the youth, junior, and senior level of an athletic event. How could anyone even worry about his legacy?

Above and beyond all of these accomplishments, though, is the spirit in which they were achieved. Many before him were fast, and set world records, but none of them did what Bolt has done. He brought joy and levity to an arena that was previously stoic and stiff, his personality lighting up the stadiums and beaming through to our television, computer and phone screens. For almost a decade, he carried the sport of athletics on his shoulders, battered and bruised as it remains from decades of doping scandals.

Even after some other young men come along and replace him as the fastest, that megawatt personality, the dancing, the fist bumps with volunteers, the showmanship, just cannot be duplicated. And let’s not forget his sportsmanship. His lightheartedness replaced the era of big egos and trash talk, and you can see the high esteem in which he is held by even his fiercest rivals. Just look at Gatlin’s actions after he won on Saturday, and the flood of congratulatory tweets and social media posts from sportsmen and women and even statesmen from around the world.

Surely he was disappointed by the result, but Bolt has accepted his bronze medal like it was gold, with grace and humility. Those are qualities that cannot be manufactured by any PR machine. Those are characteristics of someone who was raised with quintessential Jamaican broughtupsy.

Usain St Leo Bolt has single-handedly made athletics great again, and that was a feat that required so much more than mind-bending speed. He is hanging up his spikes at just the right time. And we can only hope that there is one more medal to come when the 4x100m relays are run. We hope it’s gold, as he deserves, but whatever the result, nothing—absolutely nothing, can take the shine off of what he has created over the past 15 years. Usain, sir, you said in 2008 that you wanted to become a legend. Well, mission accomplished.

Tracey-Ann Wisdom is a freelance writer and editor based in Kingston, Jamaica. You can find her online at www.writtenbytracey.com.

Posted in #diGoftheday, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Men, Olympics, Personalities, Sports Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

#BoltDay: diGJamaica salutes Usain St Leo Bolt

Posted in Uncategorized

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Bolt set to win
  2. Mario Deane’s mother stands up for justice
  3. Dismantle gangs, get guns
  4. Reid withdraws comment about schools extorting
  5. Dr Vary Jones-Leslie laid to rest
  6. Bolt leads 8 into action today

Bolt

1. Bolt set to win

The beginning of the end. That’s what this evening’s IAAF World Championships men’s 100m heat represents for iconic Jamaica sprinter Usain Bolt, who will close the lid on an unmatched career with his final individual race this weekend at the London Stadium. Bolt and his legacy have been the highlight of the discussions and promotion around the championships. Track and field’s golden boy is turning the final pages of a story of glitches, gold, and glory that not only captivated the world, but changed the sport forever. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Mario Deane’s mother stands up for justice

While the nation is celebrating Emancipation and Independence, Mercia Fraser, the mother of Mario Deane – who died from a brutal beating he sustained while in police custody three years ago – is on another mission: a relentless bid to secure justice for her son. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Dismantle gangs, get guns

Expressing pessimism that the Zones of Special Operations Act could do a lot in lowering Jamaica’s crime rate, particularly murder, Dr Christopher Charles is stressing that no provision has been made within the legislation for the dismantling of gangs and the hunt for illegal guns, which is the island’s biggest problem. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Ruel Reid

4. Reid withdraws comment about schools extorting

Education Minister Senator Ruel Reid has withdrawn his comments alleging that some schools were engaged in extortion and corruption in breaking the policy governing the charging of fees. Reid has been under pressure since his comment a post cabinet press briefing Wednesday, rejecting claims schools which have been withholding services because parents are refusing to pay certain fees. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Dr Vary Jones-Leslie laid to rest

Scores of mourners turned out yesterday to pay their final respects to Dr Vary Jones-Leslie, the obstetrician and gynaecologist who met her demise in The Cayman Islands last month, sending shockwaves throughout the medical community in Jamaica and the region. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Bolt leads 8 into action today

Sprint superstar Usain Bolt leads eight Jamaicans in action on today’s opening day of the IAAF World Athletics Championships in London. Bolt, who is set to retire from the sport after this year’s championships, will compete in the heats men’s 100m at 2.20 p.m along with 2011 world 100m champion Yohan Blake, Julian Forte and Senoj-Jay Givans.  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. FLA still under fire
  2. Thompson ready for World Champs
  3. De Grasse out of World Champs with injury
  4. Reid lists schools breaching auxiliary fees policy
  5. One dead, four injured in Clarendon shooting
  6. Dainalyn Swaby wins Festival Queen 2017

1. FLA still under fire

At least four months ago, the Office of the Contractor General (OCG) started probing the Firearm Licensing Authority (FLA), whose five board members resigned yesterday, 48 hours after its chairman, Dennis Wright, said that they were going nowhere over the unfolding gun-licence scandal. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Thompson ready for World Champs

Jamaican sprinting star Elaine Thompson says she is in good shape heading into the World Championships in London adding that she has fully recovered from an Achilles issue that was bothering her a few weeks ago. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. De Grasse out of World Champs with injury

Canadian sprinter Andre De Grasse will miss the IAAF World Championships in London after suffering a grade two hamstring strain on Monday. Agent Paul Doyle confirmed to The Gleaner that the Olympic 100m bronze and 200m silver medal winner suffered the injury during his last training session, while he was practising his starts. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Ruel Reid

4. Reid lists schools breaching auxiliary fees policy

Education minister, Ruel Reid, has named five schools he says are breaching the governments no auxiliary fee policy, and is warning others he’ll be taking action if they find ways to charge parents. At a post-Cabinet media briefing today, Senator Reid said the schools already brought to his attention are St Andrew High School for Girls, Mona High, The Queen’s School, Holy Childhood High and St Thomas Technical High. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. One dead, four injured in Clarendon shooting

The Clarendon police are investigating last night’s fatal shooting of a man and the injuring of four others in Lionel Town. The dead man has been identified as 44-year-old carpenter Kingsley Henry, also  ‘Sleepy’, of  King Street. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Dainalyn Swaby wins Festival Queen 2017

Miss St Elizabeth Dainalyn Swaby last night became the first contestant from the parish to win the Miss Jamaica Festival Queen competition. Swaby, a crowd favourite, also walked away from the National Arena in Kingston with several sectional prizes including the one for the most culturally aware contestant. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

5 Essential Facts Every Jamaican Ought To Know About Paul Bogle

Sometimes it is surprising to find out that nationals in a country are unaware of some very important data regarding their history. We don’t want that to be Jamaicans, so we’re providing you with five essential facts every Jamaican needs to know about Paul Bogle.

1. He was a free black from Stony Gut.

Paul Bogle was born free in Stony Gut, St Thomas, and had the rare privilege of being a black man who owned land. He was also a deacon in the Baptist Church. He was appointed a deacon by another National Hero in Jamaica, George William Gordon, who was also a member of the Native Baptist Church.

2. He could vote.

As an adult, Paul Bogle was one of the 106 St. Thomas people with the right to vote. He was a strong supporter of George William Gordon, and it was this support, as well as the support of other members of the Native Baptist Church, which got Gordon elected to the National Assembly to represent St Thomas.

3. He led the Morant Bay Rebellion.

In August, 1865,  Bogle led a peaceful march to Spanish Town, hopeful for a meeting with Governor Eyre, who refused to see the protesters. On October 11, 1865, he led a protest to the Morant Bay Court House, which resulted in violent confrontations with the security forces, causing over 500 deaths. The court house was also burnt to the ground, and a price was put on Bogle’s head.

4. He was hanged for organising the Morant Bay Rebellion.

Bogle was captured on October 24, 1865, and hanged that very day for his role in organising the Morant Bay Rebellion. His actions had given the poor Negro working classes hope, which threatened the stability of society’s racially prejudiced hierarchy. His death was used as an example of what happens to persons who tried to change this hierarchy.

5. He was made a National Hero.

Bogle was honoured with the Order of the National Hero in 1969. His face also appeared on the Jamaican $2 note, which was discontinued in 1989. His face is now on the 10-cent coin.


Sources: diG National Heroes, The Heroes Art Connection, JIS Paul Bogle,

Posted in Heritage, History, Jamaica, Men, National Heroes, Personalities, Series, Uncategorized Tagged with: , , , ,