6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. ZOSOs extended for 60 days
  2. Commonwealth Games: More medals for Ja
  3. Finance Minister addresses Gov’t multimillion spend on luxury vehicles
  4. Keith Clarke fam disappointed by murder trial delays
  5. Renovated Chapelton Family Court opens
  6. Ebenezer Home for mentally ill, homeless faces closure

1. ZOSOs extended for 60 days

The House of Representatives this afternoon approved 60-day extensions of the Zones of Special Operations (ZOSOs) in Mount Salem, St James and in Denham Town, Kingston. “There have been no reports of major crimes, no abuse by the security forces, and the residents continue to cooperate with the security forces,” said Prime Minister Andrew Holness in relation to Mount Salem. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Commonwealth Games: More medals for Ja

Shericka Jackson took the silver medal in the women’s 200m; Janieve Russell secured gold in the women’s 400m, while Jaheel Hyde copped a bronze in the men’s equivalent at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia . See full stories on the Gleaner’s website: Jackson & Elaine Thompson, Russell & Hyde

Nigel Clarke

3. Finance Minister addresses multimillion Gov’t spend on luxury vehicles

Finance Minister Dr Nigel Clarke this afternoon in Parliament described as incorrect a Sunday Gleaner article which stated that the Andrew Holness administration has spent $190 million on luxury vehicles. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Keith Clarke fam disappointed by murder trial delays

The family of slain businessman Keith Clarke is disappointed that the murder trial of the three Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) soldiers accused of killing him has again been delayed, their attorney has revealed. Corporal Odel Buckley, Lance Corporal Greg Tingling and Private Arnold Henry, were scheduled to go on trial on Monday for shooting Clarke 21 times inside his Kirkland Close, St Andrew home on May 27, 2010. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Renovated Chapelton Family Court open

Residents of Chapelton and neighbouring communities in Clarendon now have a newly renovated Family Court, which was refurbished with funds provided by the European Union (EU) and government of Canada. The facility, which is located at the Chapelton courthouse, was officially opened last week by Justice Minister Delroy Chuck and Chief Justice Bryan Sykes. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Ebenezer Home for mentally ill, homeless faces closure

The Manchester-based Ebenezer Home for the mentally challenged and the homeless, which focuses on treating and rehabilitating individuals and placing them back into their communities or with families, has fallen on hard times and could close its doors as early as May if it doesn’t receive much-needed assistance. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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7 Facts About NIDS – Jamaica’s National Identification System

1. What is NIDS?

NIDS stands for National Identification System. It is a system that will be used to digitally register ALL Jamaicans. The plan is to use the information gathered from NIDS to establish a database of Jamaican citizens and other individuals ordinarily resident in Jamaica. According to the Government of Jamaica’s website, NIDS is: “is a unique, reliable and secure way of verifying an individual’s identity.”

2. How will NIDS work?

By assigning to each person a National Identification Number (NIN) that they can use as a primary source of identity assurance and verification. In addition, NIDS will facilitate the issuance of a National Identification Card (NIC). According to the official NIDS website, the National Identification Card (NIC) will be required for all persons registered under NIDS. The NIC is “a unique card issued to a registered individual and verified individual. The NIC includes your NIN, photo, address,  manual signature and match on cards applications to support authentication online.”

3. Who will have to use NIDS?

  1. Any individual who is a citizen of Jamaica
  2. Permanent lawful residents of Jamaica
  3. Temporary residents of Jamaica lawfully residing in Jamaica for a period of six months or more

4. What information will NIDS require from you?

  1. Biographic
  2. Biometric
  3. Demographic

5. When will it be rolled out?

September 2019

6. Why use NIDS? What’s wrong with what we have now?

According to the Government, as things stand now, Jamaica does not have a central national database. Different systems use different numbers for different purposes, and there is no way – right now – of easily and quickly finding out when a person is assuming m,ore than one identities (which is a crime). As things stand, it is also difficult for all of these different agencies to share information with each other, so NIDS is the proposed solution that will ensure that all of the information is in one secure place and readily available to all agencies.

According to the Government’s website, this should:

  • enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of Government agencies, and the management and delivery of Government services to the public;
  • enhance Government’s ability to ascertain compliance with critical obligations (like tax compliance);
  • strengthen immigration, border control management, public safety and national security;
  • reduce the need to register for each benefit and/or obligation;
  • eliminate the duplication of individuals in public sector databases;
  • assist in the fight against crime by providing the relevant authorities access to a secure database which captures civil and biometric data of citizens and residents in Jamaica; and
  • minimize the capacity for an individual to assume multiple identities (to do illegal things like fraud, scamming, money laundering).

7. How will NIDS affect how you do business?

A Gleaner article ‘No ID, No Access’ has made it clear that under NIDS, Jamaicans without a National Identification Card (NIC) will not be able to do business with government agencies. Additionally, persons without the national ID might also face serious challenges as they seek to do business with the private sector.

 

Sources:
Jamaica Gleaner: No ID, No Access
Jamaica Gleaner: NIDS rollout come Sept 2019
GOJ NIDS website
NIDS Know The Facts

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Tufton apologises to CRH staff
  2. Developer hits back at Samuda in sewage row
  3. More J’cans embrace cremation
  4. C’bean girls to ‘hack’ safer future
  5. Commonwealth Games: Ja hopes for more gold
  6. Butch Hendrickson doubles support with manufacturers

Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton

1. Tufton apologises to CRH staff

In the wake of recent reports from the Nurses Association of Jamaica (NAJ) that more than 100 nurses have been adversely impacted by the noxious fumes at Cornwall Regional Hospital, Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton has apologised for the discomfort suffered by the medical staff. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Developer hits back at Samuda in sewage row

Landmark Developers Limited has fired back at the minister with responsibility for housing for asking the police to bar them from disconnecting residents of Liberty Estate, St Mary, from the incomplete sewerage system. The company argued that it is inappropriate for the police to intervene in a civil dispute. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. More J’cans embracing cremation

In-ground burial is still the leading and preferred type among Jamaicans. However, Ingrid Chambers, chief executive officer of Meadowrest Memorial Gardens in St Catherine, has disclosed that cremation is becoming more popular. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. C’bean girls to ‘hack’ safer future

Over 800 girls across five Caribbean countries – Jamaica, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana and St. Vincent and the Grenadines – will come together for an immersive experience in technology in celebration of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Girls in ICT Day on April 26. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Commonwealth Games: Ja hopes for more gold

Jamaican long distance runner Aisha Praught-Leer was full of confidence ahead of her women’s 3000m steeplechase final at the 2018 Commonwealth Games on Australia’s Gold Coast this morning (Jamaica time). The Jamaican will be among those looking to continue Jamaica’s impressive showing at the championships, after yesterday’s double gold and double silver medals performances. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Butch Hendrickson doubles support for manufacturers

Small local manufacturers are to benefit from a doubling of support from the National Baking Company when it hosts the Bold Ones at Expo Jamaica 2018 at the National Indoor Sports Centre next month, Butch Hendrickson, the company’s chairman and chief executive officer, disclosed yesterday. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Tufton defends decisions re CRH
  2. Develop rural towns to address urban drift – McKenzie
  3. Commonwealth Games updates
  4. 70-y-o businessman shot dead
  5. Seize assets of farm terrorists – JAS
  6. Gleaner names new reader ombudsman

Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton

1. Tufton defends decisions re CRH

Despite calls for his resignation by the parliamentary Opposition for allegedly mishandling the ongoing health crisis at Cornwall Regional Hospital, Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton has insisted that the ministry acted responsibly when it was first discovered that mould was the source of the contamination affecting the facility. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Develop rural towns to address urban drift – McKenzie

Jamaica’s urban centres, like those in other English-speaking Caribbean countries, are fast becoming overpopulated as a result of the movement of people from rural areas, thus putting a strain on social amenities and physical infrastructure, says Local Government Minister Desmond McKenzie. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Commonwealth Games updates

Defending champion Kimberly Williams produced a lifetime best to win gold with her last attempt in the women’s triple jump final at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

Javon Francis produced a strong late charge to win bronze in the men’s 400m final at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. 70-y-o businessman shot dead

The Portland police are searching for clues to hunt down the killers of 70-year-old businessman Lloyd Chambers. Chambers last night became the fifth person to be murdered in the eastern parish since the start of the year after he was shot at his home in Windsor Castle district. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Seize assets of farm terrorists – JAS

The community of Raymonds in Clarendon is still reeling from the gruesome killing of two goat farmers who were found on Thursday with their throats slashed and machete wounds over their bodies. The farmers – 74-year-old Altimond Harrison of Raymonds District in Hayes and 55-year-old Vincent Hudson of Bog District in Lionel Town were found in bushes in the Community. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Gleaner names new reader ombudsman

As part of its continued commitment to resolve all public complaints relating to its content, The Gleaner has named a new reader ombudsman. He is retired High Court judge, Justice Roy Anderson, who assumed duties on April 1. Anderson is a past student of Titchfield High School in Port Antonio, Portland; the University of the West Indies; London University and Georgetown University in the United States. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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Learn-The-Terms for Financial Literacy Month: Interest

April is observed as Financial Literacy Month. And fittingly so. Financial literacy is an area that many people are not very knowledgeable about. The term itself might not be one that people are even familiar with. But look at the two words in the term:

  1. FINANCIAL: Having to do with money or general finances
  2. LITERACY: Competence or knowledge in an area

So financial literacy is a person’s ability to use their knowledge and skills to manage money and general finances well. In recognition of this month, we are explaining the meanings of some key terms that you should know for your own personal financial literacy.

Interest

BusinessDictionary defines interest as “the fee you pay to use another person’s money. To the borrower it is the cost of renting money, to the lender the income from lending it.”  So, for example, when you take a loan from the bank, for you, interest is the extra money you pay to the bank, different from the loan that you must repay. For the bank, interest is the money they get from you different from the sum of the loan that you repay. To you, this money represents an expense. To the bank, it represents income.

Why should you pay attention to interest?

Interest is an important term to know in your quest for financial literacy. Here are two key reasons:

1. What you can make

Interest is something you should give special consideration to because, when exercised in your favour, it can help you to profit. Look at your savings and investment accounts. What is the interest rate that financial institutions are paying you on these savings and investments? Is it possible for you to get a better interest rate elsewhere? Interest represents the potential to earn money on your money if you are smart about where you put your money, and for how long.

2. What you can lose

Also pay attention to the interest attached to loans and other borrowing instruments from your financial institutions. Go for the lowest rate possible. Credit unions usually offer better interest rates on borrowing than banks, but be sure to do your research before committing to a loan or credit card, to ensure that you do not end up paying way more than you had bargained for. This is also  important for when purchasing items on layaway or higher purchase plans. Watch that interest. IN some cases, you could end up paying two or three times more than the cash price. So watch out.

 

Sources: EconomicsDiscussion.net

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Bounty on Bobby – Alleged gun smugglers threaten to kill minister
  2. Commonwealth Games: Sprinters on point
  3. Tufton chides Campbell for false statements
  4. Chemicals expert says don’t panic re CRH
  5. Parents’ concerns re HPV vaccine valid
  6. Late Homestead councillor laid to rest

Robert ‘Bobby’ Montague

1. Bounty on Bobby – Alleged gun smugglers threaten to kill minister

Security has been increased around former Minister of National Security, Robert Montague, following reports out of the United States of a possible threat on his life by gunrunners. Montague, who was reassigned to the ministry of transport and mining in the recent Cabinet reshuffle, has now been granted additional police personnel at all times, with security also beefed up at his house. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Commonwealth Games: Sprinters on point

All three Jamaican sprint hurdlers – including schoolboy De’Jour Russell, will compete in the 110m hurdles final at the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia after contrasting results. The Jamaicans women’s 400m trio is also safely through to the next round of their event after solid performances. See full story on the Gleaner’s website. See more here.

Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton

3. Tufton chides Campbell for false statements

Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton has rejected the allegation by Opposition Spokesman on Heath Dr Dayton Campbell that the authorities kept staff at the Cornwall Regional Hospital working in areas infested with mould without taking any action. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Chemicals expert says don’t panic re CRH

Amid fears that some health workers stationed at the Cornwall Regional Hospital (CRH) could have been exposed to serious health hazards, based on a Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) report pointing out that cancer-causing agents have been found in the hospital, renowned chemist Professor Ishenkumba Kahwa has declared it’s not time to panic. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Parents’ concerns re HPV vaccine valid

While gynaecologic oncologist Dr Matthew Taylor does not believe that some of the negative symptoms attributed to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine are true, he feels that the Government erred in not addressing some of the concerns raised by parents when the vaccine was introduced in secondary schools last year. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Late Homestead Councillor laid to rest

Owen Andrew Palmer, late councillor for the Homestead division and minority leader for the Jamaica Labour Party caucus at the St Catherine Municipal Corporation, was laid to rest at the Meadowrest Memorial Park in St Catherine on Saturday after a thanksgiving celebration service for his life held at the Worship Centre on Old Harbour Road, Spanish Town. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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Did You Know? 5 Interesting Facts About Jamaica’s Commonwealth Games 2018 Team

Triathlete Llori Sharpe

Jamaica’s team to the Commonwealth Games, which run from April 4-15, 2018, is on location and already engaged in the fight for golden glory in various sporting events. They have the honour and serious responsibility of continuing what has been along legacy of outstanding performances by their nation at the Games. Here are five facts about Jamaica’s Commonwealth Games 2018 team.

  1. The country will be competing in 15 different sporting disciplines – the largest number it has participated in so far. Of these, the nation will be taking part in lawn bowls, wrestling, rugby sevens and triathlon for the first time.
  2. Jamaica’s first medal in the 2018 Games came from Alia Atkinson, who won silver in the 50m breaststroke in 30.76 seconds, behind England’s Sarah Vasey, who won in 30.60 seconds. Alia also won silver in this event at the Glasgow 2014 games.
  3. Alia Atkinson

    Two Jamaicans, Yohan Blake and Elaine Thompson, have been listed by the AFP Sports among eight to watch at this year’s staging of the games.

  4. Jamaica’s female representative in the triathlon, Llori Sharpe, is only 17 years old and is a student of St Andrew High School for Girls.
  5. Jamaica’s bowls team have been dubbed the Reggae Rollers, and their entrance in the Commonwealth Games is largely through the pioneering effort of team member Andrew Newell to get the sport formalised and internationally recognised in Jamaica.
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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. LNG hub in sight
  2. Schools improving – NEI
  3. Spencer makes apologies through ombudsman
  4. All-island data needed in cancer fight
  5. Jamaicans top UN hackathon in Switzerland
  6. NAJ points scary pic of CRH situation

1. LNG hub in sight

Energy giant New Fortress will be making further steps in a matter of weeks to begin “dropping irons” in its preparatory work for the construction of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) hub. New Fortress founder and chairman Wesley Edens made the announcement on Wednesday at the unveiling of several LNG-power tractor heads at Devon House in St Andrew, introduced by local industrial gas supplier IGL. Edens said that it was part of efforts to make Jamaica the LNG hub in the region, and by so doing, reduce dependency on diesel and gasoline. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Schools improving – NEI

The National Education Inspectorate (NEI) 2017 Report has revealed that there are improvements across all eight indicators of school effectiveness in the 189 institutions inspected. Of the 189 schools inspected by NEI personnel during the last academic year, 147 were primary while 42 were secondary. Within these schools, the team observed 10,000 lessons, administered 12,000 questionnaires, conducted 1,200 interviews, and reviewed 2,800 documents. The schools are located across the six education regions. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Spencer makes apologies through ombudsman

State Minister for National Security Rudyard Spencer has issued a formal apology through a letter written by the political ombudsman, Donna Parchment Brown, for partisan comments he made at a Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) meeting in Bellefield, Manchester, on March 18. Parchment Brown summoned Spencer to a meeting on Tuesday to discuss the breach of standard as outlined in the Agreement and Declaration on Political Conduct. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. All-island data needed in cancer fight

The Jamaica Cancer Society (JCS) has called for a national cancer research agenda to improve the effectiveness of cancer control through cancer research and surveillance. But for this to be achieved, Yulit Gordon, executive director of the JCS, has underscored the importance of all-island data, which must be provided by the National Cancer Registry (NCR), which was launched by the Ministry of Health (MOH) five years ago. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. J’cans top UN hackathon in Switzerland

The United Nation’s World Summit on Information Technology this year saw more than 30 nationalities, 14 teams and a wide range of experienced individuals participating in the ‘Hack Against Hunger’ Hackathon, which was held in Geneva, Switzerland. However, it was a four-member team which represented Jamaica, who was one of three teams, who were announced as winners after presenting a web- and mobile-based application on increasing food security. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. NAJ paints scary pic of CRH situation

The emission of noxious fumes plaguing the Cornwall Regional Hospital (CRH) in Montego Bay, St James, could be far more serious than initially believed as more than 100 nurses have been adversely affected, according to Carmen Johnson, president of the Nurses’ Association of Jamaica (NAJ). See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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Learn-The-Terms for Financial Literacy Month: Budget

April is observed as Financial Literacy Month. And fittingly so. Financial literacy is an area that many people are not very knowledgeable about. The term itself might not be one that people are even familiar with. But look at the two words in the term:

  1. FINANCIAL: Having to do with money or general finances
  2. LITERACY: Competence or knowledge in an area

So financial literacy is a person’s ability to use their knowledge and skills to manage money and general finances well. In recognition of this month, we are explaining the meanings of some key terms that you should know for your own personal financial literacy.

Budget

Budgeting is a lovely concept that most people aspire to, but never actually get around to doing. According to the Plain English Guide to Financial Terms, financial literacy is “A plan of spending over a certain length of time, based on how much money a person has”.

According to BusinessDictionary, a budget serves as:

(1) plan of action for achieving quantified objectives

This means that a budget helps you to have a set plan of action for what you need to achieve financially. It gives you a clear of idea of how much money you have, and what you can do with it. Having a budget, then, helps you to make the decision of which are the best ways to spend your money.

(2) standard for measuring performance

A budget helps you to track what you have been doing with your money. After using a budget for a while, you will be able to see where most of your money goes. Based on that information, you can make decisions to change your spending habits to get the most out of your money.

(3) device for coping with foreseeable adverse situations

A budget is a great way to plan for the future. You can save using a budget, as a buffer against all kinds of things that can happen in the future. A budget is especially useful for the situations that you can foresee. To be forewarned is to be forearmed. Seeing ahead means planning ahead and making sure that measures are in place for future difficulties.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Chief Justice promises faster divorces
  2. PM agrees to tweak SOE regulations
  3. Man fatally shot in August Town gun attack
  4. Reputed gangster shot dead
  5. Maintenance causes disruptions for NWC customers
  6. Chuck rebukes High Court judge over death squad comment

1. Chief Justice promises faster divorces

Chief Justice Bryan Sykes, seeking to underscore that it won’t be business as usual in the nation’s court system, has announced that come September, it should take weeks, not years, to complete divorce cases and validate wills. Sykes also announced plans to change the way cases are listed in the criminal courts as part of the strategy to reduce the backlog of cases crippling the courts. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. PM agrees to tweak SOE regulations

Prime Minister Andrew Holness has acquiesced to a proposal by Opposition Leader Dr Peter Phillips that some provisions in the regulations governing states of public emergency should be adjusted. This is to make it clear that certain powers given to the minister of national security can only be exercised upon the advice of the heads of the security forces or the competent authority. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Man fatally shot in August Town attack

Member of Parliament for St Andrew Eastern Fayval Williams is calling for residents of August Town to support the government’s latest crime-fighting initiative, Jamaica Eye, as part of efforts to curb the violence in the area. Jamaica Eye, which was launched recently, is a network of closed-circuit television aimed at tackling crime. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Reputed gangster shot dead

Uriel ‘Rooksie’ James, the reputed leader of the Rose Town-based Discipline Gang has been shot dead. Police sources say his body was discovered in a car in St Andrew in the vicinity of Dunrobin. No further detail was immediately available. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Maintenance causes disruptions for NWC customers

Customers in several communities across the Corporate Area will have their regular water service disrupted as the National Water Commission (NWC) undertakes system maintenance works. The NWC has advised that work will begin as part of its ongoing non-revenue water-reduction programme being carried out with co-management partners Miya International. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Chuck rebukes High Court judge over death squad comment

A High Court judge has prompted a sharp rebuke from Justice Minister Delroy Chuck for threatening to toss out three of the so-called police death squad cases that have stalled in the courts. This because of the Government’s refusal to pay the attorneys representing the accused cops. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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