The Rebel Salute Round-Up: Who Was Hot & Who Was Not

The umbrellas they used to shelter from the rain in the night were the same umbrellas they used to shelter from the sun in the morning going on to afternoon. Two days of real roots reggae and skanking drew to a close at almost noon on Sunday, January 14, 2018. There were so many hiccups that could have dampened patrons’ and organisers’ spirits, so many different things could have derailed the show. But despite the odds of ankle-deep mud, more than three hours of non-stop rain at one point, a blazing sun in the early morning hours, and the large volumes of people and vehicular traffic – Rebel Salute’s 25th anniversary staging was, all in all, a massive success. Here is diGJamaica’s listing of the things and people who stood out – or didn’t on each night.

Friday & Saturday

Always hot

Organisers and patrons: Respect is due to the faith demonstrated by organisers and patrons, who, despite the extremely difficult conditions created by first buckets of rain and then ankle-deep mud that stuck to feet, wheels, shoes … remained loyal to the Rebel Salute cause. On the organisers’ part, the show was not cancelled, and on the part of patrons, numbers reflected no dampening of spirits. Up to one o’clock in the morning, people were still buying tickets and entering the venue. That level of loyalty is testament to the calibre of a show that has clearly won the hearts of many – both locally and internationally.

Mutabaruka: This man is the resident host of Rebel Salute. What is so good about Muta? Let us count the ways … He doesn’t try hard, there is nothing forced about him, he is extremely honest and extremely natural. He’s witty, and he is not afraid to bring up serious current affairs issues in between sets – but in a manner that enhances the overall atmosphere of the event. Some of his jokes are legendary: Every year, he reminds the women wearing ‘cheap makeup’ that ‘make it look like their face is melting’ to touch up just before the sun comes out – usually to peals of laughter. And he’s a story-teller. This year, he told the story of the one-hand man with the Lucozade who said he gave a vendor a $5000 and didn’t get back change in an effort to get a money from Muta. His dramatics also add spice and life to the show: After Ding Dong’s performance, Muta came on stage holding his heart and said, “Mi tiyad … and mi siddown fi di whole set.”

Friday

Who was hot?

Third World: From the moment they got on the stage, they owned it and stole the show in a way that left every other performer looking somewhat lacking by comparison. Stephen ‘Cat’ Coore’s solo piece of Redemption Song was a real crowd pleaser, as was AJ Nicholson’s rendition of Con Te Partiro. Third World’s seamless catalog of hit after hit, packaged in a very compact, well-planned set, got the people singing along. Everything from 96 Degrees to How Can It Be Forbidden If It’s Love went down well, and beautifully captured the essence of what Third World represents – a real roots reggae legacy that clearly will live on, even after Bunny Rugs’ departure. What was also obvious to many was that AJ had found his comfortable footing as lead singer for the group.

Lionel Rookwood photo
Agent Sasco in action at Rebel Salute 2018.

Agent Sasco: Now he was just amazing. He hit the stage late Saturday morning, and brought the kind of energy nad light for which he has become known. His supporting vocalists were in nice Africa-inspired prints – a look he complemented with his own dashiki outfit. Agent Sasco took the audience back in time, with hits from his days as Assasin, then brought them into the present with current crowd pleasers. Even when he said, “Can I leave?”, the audience made it clcear how ,much they were nenkoying him with a resounding, “Nooo!” Not until he sang his new song, Winning, were they satisfied.

Jesse Royal: He was so easy breezy. People who know him, know his lyrics are always charged, and that he will be dancing. Jesse Royal did not disappoint. He went on stage in the wee hours of the morning, and carved out a niche for himself that saw his Chronixx collaboration – Modern Day Judas – getting him his biggest forward for the night.

Bushman: Even Muta said this dynamic artiste caused the people to wake up and wipe off the ‘lelle’ water from their mouths.

Honorable Mentions:

J.C. Lodge: People really liked her. Telephone Love turned out to be one her most well-loved songs, and, for someone who has been out of the limelight for quite a while, her stage presence and command of the crowd was refreshingly on point. Her song selections also went over very well with the audience.

Glacia Robinson: The consensus was that she had a wonderful set, but it did not receive the level of enthusiasm that other artistes got. Her biggest hit was Hold my Hand Today – the song with which she won the JCDC 1998 Gospel Song Competition, and for which she is well -known. Otherwise, her set was  respected and appreciated as a pause to acknowledge The Almighty, though not fully indulged and engaged by the audience.

Coffee: Introduced by Coco Tea, this up-and-coming crooner is a mix between a young Queen Ifrica and Lila I’Kay. She has a distinct voice – and deejays and sings. She was very comfortable on the stage and got a huge forward from the crowd. Just 17 years old, Coffee wowed the crowd with her smooth vocals and nifty deejaying.

Who was not hot?

Coco Tea: First of all, let it be said that Coco Tea is a perennial favourite. He has hits upon hits and respect is due. BUT. His disreagard for his set’s time limit was most disappointing. When his time was up, he refused to leave the stage, even after there were clear calls from the audience for him to come down. His best move was his tribute song for Rebel Salute – a tune he made up specially for the event, but after that, it all kinda went south. Consensus was he took way too long to get his engine going, and left all of his best hits for last – when his time on stage had expired. Another good move on his part? Introducing the crowd to 17-year-old singing and deejaying wonder, Coffee, who, funny enough, maybe got more forwards than him.

Saturday

Who was hot?

Capleton: This is the undisputed Fireman. King Shango himself. He boom flicks, he cartwheels, he pronounces a ‘bun out’ on a long list of things that usually gets the crowd going wild – with humorous inserts that facilitate him catching his breath. His set gets blow torches (which are not quite legal) and the uplifted hands with the gun fingers normally stay up until Capleton comes down. REally cool moment? He did a song where he mentioned all the shows he has performed at over the years, highlighting the fact that, save for two – Rebel Salute and Reggae Sumfest – none of these shows exist anymore. Consensus was, Capleton started on a high and ended on an astronomical, out-of-this-world plane …

Romain Virgo: Sir Virgo is everybody’s favourite reggae crooner. He made best-dressed list, and demonstrated what it meant to be the quintessential singing professional. The growth in his career and catalog were evident. He got the older and younger demographic moving at the same time. He came on very early, did a clean set, and proved why he is everybody’s favourite singjay, with songs like Love Doctor, his new song with Chris Martin Leave People Business Alone, Way Too Beautiful … He noted that he hadn’t been on the show since 2009, and the audience response was clear: they were very glad to have him back.

Elephant Man: The Energy God lit up the stage and venue with his always-lively performance. He came on around nine in the morning when the sun was blazing, and from the time he touched the stage until he left, everyone forgot about the heat and the tiredness and the sweating and worked even more of all three – putting AKs over the wall, stepping pon di river, doing the gully creeper, Willy bounce, nuh linga … every dance to which Elephant man’s name is attached. One patron noted, Elephant Man is the reason that they tie down equipment on stage. His noticeable weight gain did not prohibit him from climbing up on the speaker boxes on the stage … They don’t call him the Energy God for nothing.

The selectors: When the heavens opened and the rains descended, it was the selectors who kept the party going. With selections that everyone agreed were ‘just right’, they helped what could have been a failing momentum with sweet music that kept the rain-soaked, mud-splashed audience in a nice zone, rocking and waiting for the interrupted show to resume.

Honourable mentions:

Contributed
It was not uncommon to see patrons walking through the Rebel Salute venue with scandal bags on their feet.

The Rebel Salute Slippers Salesman: Big-ups to the man who saw an opportunity in the midst of adversity and, in true Jamaican style, capitalised. Providing mud-weary Saluters with scandal bags to cover their shoes, these entrepreneurs racked up steady sales throughout the night – turning a lemony moment of life into sweet lemonade.

Malik, the drummer from Queen Ifrica’s set: His solo was a thing of beauty – the throwing up sticks, moon dancing around the drum, finding beat and rhythm form every corner of his instruments and weaving skilful and entertaining movements into his set. This youth brought the house all the way down!

Beres Hammond: Three words can make a concert. That’s the takeaway from Beres Hammond’s stint during Luciano’s set. The man sang three words – “I’m so tired” – and got one of the night’s biggest forwards. The crowd erupted into cheers and screams and shouts that not even Luciano himself was getting. The talk was that Rebel Salute ‘slap weh’ because Beres sang three words – count ’em: one, two, three …

Queen Ifrica’s son, Malawe: He made a surprise appearance during the Ding Dong-Ravers set and showed off his dancing ability, to shouts and cheers from an appreciative audience.

Queen Ifrica: Her son was good; her drummer was great, but the empress herself was also unparalleled in her look, sound and delivery. Notable moments? She sang Daddy Don’t Touch Me There in Spanish, and raised the issue of her song being banned internally (the Broadcasting Commission said they have not banned her song) by some radio stations.

 

What was not hot?

I-Octane: The common complaint was that he talked out his set. According to one patron, “He cannot make my top 5 because he did not actually perform. He wasted the time talking.” There are some who will argue that they liked his interaction with the audience (AKA plenty talking), but for some, it was exasperating to hear him going on and on about the bad mind, the not being signed to a label, having to do his own thing … Some felt more like he was venting than performing.

Jahmeil: Best dressed for the night, he was perhaps also the most talkative – to the point where people started to say, “Sing! Stop talking. Just sing.”

Althea & Donna: They seemed incoherent, forgetting the lines to their song, obviously missing cues … The attempt was to give the audience a throwback to the good old days of “not popping style” and “strictly rules”, but after these ladies’ performance, hte lesson should be that maybe some eras are best left forgotten.

Barrington Levy: He complained that he had to work too hard for his forward, and then proceeded to tell the audience that he was going to Germany and he was sure they would give him a better forward than he was getting from the Rebel Salute crowd. Of course, this won him no favours.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. 61 murders in first 13 days
  2. Ian Boyne laid to rest
  3. Rebel Salute ends on a high note
  4. Jamaican to receive Martin Luther King Jr award
  5. AC Marriott to make C’bean debut in Kgn
  6. Portland Roadway partly open

1. 61 murders in first 13 days

The country’s murder rate continues to spiral as police figures show 61 murders have been committed since the start of the year. The police statistics show that up to January 13, there were 61 murders, 34 shootings and 34 robberies. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Ian Boyne laid to rest

The message that hit home for the hundreds who gathered to celebrate the life of Ian Anthony Boyne at the National Indoor Sports Centre in Kingston yesterday came from the veteran journalist himself – and in no uncertain terms. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3.Rebel Salute ends on a high note

It’s more than just the music, it’s the experience. That is what, patrons revealed, keeps them coming back, as they celebrated 25 years of the annual reggae music festival at Grizzlys Plantation Cove in St Ann over the weekend. It was two days of music, of course, but it was also two days of togetherness and the best of Jamaica’s culture on display, including food and dance and, yes, marijuana. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Jamaican to receive Martin Luther King Jr award

When he takes the stage today to accept the 2018 Martin Luther King (MLK) Jr Community Service Award for Lifetime Achievement, Professor Dexter Barrington Gordon just won’t accept in the name of his faithful family and colleagues. The 62-year-old native of Old Harbour Bay, St Catherine, will also accept the prestigious award in memory of the renowned civil-rights leader whose ideologies began to shape his character decades before he boarded a plane to the United States. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. AC Marriott to make C’bean debut in Kgn

The hotel being developed in Kingston by Sandals Resort International will be branded as AC Marriott. AC is said to be Marriott’s design-focused brand, with 90 hotels across Europe, Latin America and the United States. The Sandals development at Lady Musgrave Road in the golden triangle area of Kingston is said to be the first AC hotel in the Caribbean. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Portland Roadway partly open

The roadway at West Hill in Portland, which collapsed on Saturday leaving thousands of residents marooned, is now partially open. A work crew toiled Saturday night into yesterday to restore a section of that roadway, which is now open to single-lane traffic and pedestrians. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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7 ‘Profile’ Moments From The Life of Ian Boyne

A journalist for almost 30 years, Ian Anthony Boyne, CD, 60, was one of Jamaica’s most prolific, well-known and respected media personalities. His many accomplishments were beyond remarkable, and his attempt to build what he called ‘positive journalism’ has left an indelible impression on the nation’s collective memory. Boyne passed at a young 60, but not before leaving a legacy well in excess of his just 30 years in journalism.

For his outstanding contribution to Jamaican media and journalism, he was awarded the national honour of Order of Distinction in the rank of Commander in October 2009. Here’s a list of some of his more memorable accomplishments:

  1. Boyne served as press secretary, speech writer and public relations consultant to prime ministers and government ministers.
  2. In 1981, Boyne won the Press Association of Jamaica (PAJ) Award for Distinguished Religious Writing – he was the only jounalist to ever get that award.
  3. Editor Dudley Stokes introduced his baker’s dozen of 13 new columnists in October/November 1987. Boyne has been a columnist with the Gleaner since that time until his death.
  4. He was host of Jamaica’s longest-running non-seasonal television interview programme, ‘Profile’, launched in February 1987, which developed a large and faithful Sunday evening following. Over the course of the programme, he interviewed more than 1,300 persons.
  5. He was Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the Jamaica Information Service (JIS), an appointment he received in 2010.
  6. In 2002, he started the programme ‘Religious Hardtalk’ on RJR FM radio. Two years later, in March 2004, it made a TV debut.
  7. The Press Association of Jamaica’s Morris Cargill Award for Opinion Journalism, which he won in 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2009. 

Sources:

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. US diplomat says travel advisory shouldn’t cause alarm
  2. No hatchet to bury between Montague, Quallo
  3. US travel advisory worries JHTA head
  4. Gleaner inks deal with RSPL
  5. Novelette Grant heads to retirement
  6. Police get equipment to trace stolen cell phones

1. US diplomat says travel advisory shouldn’t cause alarm

Jeremiah Knight, counsellor for public affairs at the United States Embassy, told The Gleaner yesterday that the advisory issued by the US Department which urged Americans to exercise increased caution in Jamaica owing to crime, provided American travellers with easier access to information regarding countries they visit. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

George Quallo

2. Not hatchet to bury between Montague, Quallo

Police Commissioner George Quallo and Minister of National Security Robert Montague shared smiles, handshakes, and even a short embrace yesterday as they sought to dispel claims that their relationship had broken down. Following a meeting at the Ministry of National Security on Monday, reports surfaced that Montague had lost confidence in the commissioner and suggested that it was time for him to go. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. US travel advisory worries JHTA head

The Jamaica Hotel and Tourist Association (JHTA) says it is concerned about the travel advisory issued by the United States warning citizens about crime here, but it is more worried about the safety of the workers in the industry. “Crime against visitors is very low, but many of our staff who are living in the volatile communities are faced with this untenable situation,” JHTA president Omar Robinson told The Gleaner. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Gleaner inks deal with RSPL

The Gleaner Company (Media) Limited (GCML) is now the official print partners of the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL), following the signing of multi-year deal with the Premier League Clubs Association (PLCA). The signing of the deal, which took place at the media giant’s North Street offices earlier this week, will see the newspaper company bringing unprecedented focus to the RSPL, through multi-platform coverage, as well as promotional and developmental programmes involving league stakeholders. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Novelette Grant

5. Novelette Grant heads to retirement

After more than 30 years in the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), Deputy Commissioner Novelette Grant is ready to take her leave. Grant spent her penultimate day in office yesterday, while indicating that she would be going off and returning in February for one final day. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Police to get equipment to trace stolen cell phones

The Ministry of National Security is to spend US$45,000 to provide the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) with technology to allow the police to go after persons who steal cellular phones. Security minister Robert Montague yesterday noted that an estimate 2,400 cellular phones are stolen across the island each year. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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#TeamShaggy4Kids

Here’s how to donate to the Make A Difference Foundation

GLOBAL:

Buy a 2018 Shaggy and Friends T-shirtraetown.com

Online at Food for the Poor: foodforthepoor.org/TeamShaggy4Kids

Email for bank info: info@shaggymakeadifferencefoundation.org

JAMAICA only:

Text via Digicel : 444-4298. Deadline: January 30, 2018. Cost JMD $50. Keyword: TeamShaggy4Kids

Text via Flow: 444-4299. Deadline: January 31, 2018. Cost JMD $50. Keyword: Give

Buy WATA. J$ 3 from every bottle with the Shaggy Foundation logo. Visit watadonates.com for more information.

 

 

The Shaggy Make A Difference Foundation (SMADF) did an amazing job on January 6, 2018 at its  sixth staging of the unifying charity concert, Shaggy & Friends on the  the prestigious lawns of Jamaica House, St. Andrew. Co-Produced by Rebecca Packer-Burrell, executive director of SMADF, the concert featured amazing performances, good food and great vibes. The crowd was energized by performances from local, regional and international acts including Sting, Wyclef Jean,

tShaggy & Friends is the main vehicle through which the organization keeps its pledge to meaningfully partner with and assist the Bustamante Hospital for Children. Proceeds from this show will go towards increasing the beds in the Intensive Care Unit of the hospital, the sole paediatric facility in the island and the only full-service children’s hospital in the English-speaking Caribbean.

Shaggy and Friends Benefit Concert had its inaugural staging on January 3, 2009 after which the Shaggy Make A Difference Foundation was born. The organization has since donated more than US$1.5million in equipment and services thanks to the proceeds from the Shaggy & Friends concerts.

For more about the Shaggy Make A Difference Foundation, visit http://shaggymakeadifferencefoundation.org

For more about the Shaggy and Friends Show, visit Shaggy & Friends on Facebook and follow @ShaggynFriends on Twitter and shaggyandfriends on Instagram.

Stay tuned and keep following the #TeamShaggy4Kids hashtag on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for more information on this worthy cause.

For Gleaner articles about Shaggy and Friends, visit http://digjamaica.com/shaggy_articles

For videos about Shaggy and Friends, visit http://digjamaica.com/shaggy_videos

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

    1. Gov’t spends $11b to improve border security
    2. Urgent need for C’bean tsunami early warning system
    3. Housing among proposed fringe benefits for teachers
    4. Afros in school up for debate
    5. Eight-year-old dies from dengue
    6. Tsunami scare examined

1. Gov’t spends $11b to improve border security

National Security Minister Robert Montague says the government is spending some $11 billion to improve the country’s border security. In a release from the National Security Ministry this morning, Montague says the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) is to get six additional helicopters and four aircraft this year. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

. Urgent need for C’bean tsunami early warning system

The urgent need for early warning systems is the most poignant lesson for Ronald Jackson, head of the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Manage-ment Agency, following warnings of possible tsunami surges throughout the region. Jamaica had been monitoring the situation after a magnitude 7.6 earthquake struck in the Caribbean Sea between the coast of Honduras and The Cayman Islands on Tuesday night, causing officials to warn people around the region to be alert to the threat of possible tsunami surges. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Housing among proposed fringe benefits for teachers

The Andrew Holness administration has offered to develop state lands for public-sector teachers and reduce by 10 years their wait time for a second benefit from the National Housing Trust (NHT). The offers, government sources revealed, are part of a proposed 13-point fringe benefits package offered to the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA) in the last round of negotiations on a new wage agreement. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Davina Bennett, popular for sporting an afro

4. Afros in school up for debate

Education Minister Ruel Reid, who spoke to The Gleaner about some of the challenges in constructing the proposed grooming and nutrition policy that is expected to be implemented this term, admitted that arriving at a standardised policy comes with challenges, but indicated that the ministry would be engaging with citizens as it seeks to make the policy public by the end of March. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Eight-year-old dies from dengue

Health authorities in the Corporate Area are now probing the death of an eight-year-old boy who was diagnosed with dengue haemorrhagic fever. Health Minister Dr Christopher Tufton yesterday confirmed the incident, which occurred at the Bustamante Hospital for Children on Tuesday, but the details were not available up to press time. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Tsunami scare examined

Head of the  Mona GeoInformatics Institute Dr Parris Lyew Ayee says if Jamaica had experienced a tsunami following a major earthquake in the Caribbean Sea on Tuesday evening, the damage would have been minor.  However, he said that marine life would have received significant damage. See full story on The Gleaner’s website. And the related stories here and here.

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Jamaica and the Caribbean’s Tsunami History

What are tsunamis?

Tsunamis are a series of waves generated in the sea by sudden vertical displacements of a column of seawater. They come in all sizes from less than 1cm to tens of metres. An earthquake must have a magnitude of 6.5 or higher to trigger a tsunami. In addition, the earthquake must displace the sea floor vertically, either up or down.

Tsunamis cause damage in a number of ways: the force of the wave can destroy buildings, piers, bridges and other structures. Even relatively small waves can cause strong currents. Damage can also be caused by battering by water carried debris such as logs, boats, automobiles, etc. The retreating waves can scour the support for bridges, piers, breakwaters, etc. and cause failures. Chemical spills and fires caused by ruptured storage tanks are also common. Waves can also travel long distances up rivers as bores.

Jamaica’s tsunami history

Jamaica has experienced two tsunamis before. They were in 1692 and 1907, following the two biggest earthquakes to ever shake the island.

In the first documented major earthquake in the Caribbean, Port Royal was devastated on June 7, 1692. According to this paper by Dr Margaret D Wiggins-Grandison, head of the Earthquake Unit at the University of the West Indies – Mona,

“The sinking of a part of Port Royal into the sea in 1692 caused a wave of 1.8 metres (6 feet) to cross the [Kingston] Harbour with a withdrawal of 274 metres. At Yallahs a withdrawal of 1.6 km is mentioned though not substantiated by the Tomblin & Robson earthquake catalogue or by any consequent damage reports. In 1907, waves of 1.8 – 2.4 metres were reported along the north coast between Portland and St Ann, accompanied by withdrawal of the sea by 70-90 metres. In Kingston Harbour, waves of 2.5 metres were observed. Both events followed strong to major local earthquakes which displaced land at Port Royal and probably along the north coast suddenly and vertically into the sea. There are no reports that anyone was killed by the tsunamis. The death toll from the earthquakes was 2000 out of a population of 8,000 at Port Royal (1692) and 1,000 in Kingston (1907).”

Other accounts have attributed some of the deaths to the tsunamis.

The Caribbean’s tsunami history

The UWI Seismic Research Unit reports that “in the past 500 years, there have been 10 confirmed earthquake-generated tsunamis in the Caribbean Basin, with four causing fatalities” of an estimated 350 people. They also note that potentially destructive tsunamis occur at an average rate of 1-2 per century in the Caribbean, with the recurrence rate for tsunamis in the Caribbean being approximately: 1 destructive tsunami per century for local earthquakes, and 1 destructive tsunami per 200 years for distant earthquakes.

Of all the recorded earthquakes that have occurred in the region, the 1947 quake in El Cibao, Dominican Republic, is believed to be the largest. It reportedly measured magnitude 8.1 and generated a tsunami that caused 75 deaths and rendered 20,000 homeless, with aftershocks extending through 1947 and 1948. Another potential source for tsunamis, the submarine volcano Kick-‘em-Jenny, located 9 km north of Grenada, erupts on average every 11 years. At least two of those eruptions, in 1939 and 1965, generated small tsunamis that were witnessed on the north coast of Grenada.

Work is being done by the UWI’s Seismic Research Unit and others to develop an early warning system for tsunamis in the region. However, none currently exists. An interim arrangement exists with the Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre, who send a warning to specific government agencies in the Caribbean. A procedure for information dissemination to the public also does not exist, and is being developed.

 

Tsunami facts are taken from A Brief History of Tsunamis in the Caribbean Sea by James F Lander, Lowell S Whiteside and Patricia A Lockridge of the National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. Historical data comes from Tsunamis in Jamaica and the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management’s website, as well as the Gleaner Newspaper Archives.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. PM: Ja not under tsunami threat
  2. Commish blames improper management for Palisadoes gridlock
  3. Portlanders rally to shake off flood, mud
  4. Electronic medical records coming
  5. NWC considering prepaid water
  6. JN Bank assessing vandalised Willowdene ATM

Holness

1. PM: Ja not under tsunami threat

Prime Minister Andrew Holness has indicated that Jamaica is officially not under threat from a tsunami. The prime minister provided the update in a post on Twitter. Jamaica had been monitoring the situation after, earlier Tuesday night, a  magnitude 7.6 earthquake struck in the Caribbean Sea between the coast of Honduras and the Cayman Islands, causing officials to warn people around the region to be alert to the threat of possible tsunami surges. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Commish blames improper management for Palisadoes gridlock

Police Commissioner George Quallo has pointed the finger at Superintendent Robert Walker, commanding officer for the Kingston East Police Division, claiming that his “lack of diligence and proper management” was one of the reasons for the traffic gridlock that shut down access to the Norman Manley International Airport (NMIA) for up to eight hours on New Year’s Day. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Residents of Seaman’s Valley in the Rio Grande Valley, Portland, yesterday, fixing a pipe that was affected by the flood rains in the parish. (Gleaner photo)

3. Portlanders rally to shake off flood, mud

Cut off from the rest of Portland since Saturday when torrential rains triggered a massive landslide that blanketed the main road linking their community with Barry Hill, residents of Cornwall Barracks were yesterday still struggling to adjust to a life of isolation and dreading the likelihood of more showers. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Electronic medical records coming

The Ministry of Health will be embarking on a project this year to store patients’ health records electronically. “We will be moving assiduously in this direction,” said Sancia Bennett Templer, permanent secretary in the Ministry of Health. She noted that the proposed move to electronic health files this year would enhance confidentiality of records. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. NWC considering prepaid water

Jamaicans could have access to prepaid water supply this calendar year. That’s according to Corporate Public Relations Manager at the National Water Commission (NWC), Charles Buchanan, who, in an interview today on Power Talk on Power 106 FM, said the matter is actively being explored by the utility company. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. JN Bank assessing vandalised Willowdene ATM

The JN Bank ATM located at 27-29 Sydenham Park Way off Old Harbour Road in Spanish Town, St Catherine was vandalised early this morning. The matter has been reported to the police, who are investigating the incident. No cash was accessed from the machine by the vandals.  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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10 Historical Facts About Rebel Salute

In 2018, Rebel Salute celebrates its 25th anniversary.  It has evolved from an annual one-night ‘birthnight bash’ at Fayor’s Entertainment Centre in Mandeville to a globally recognised cultural event, attracting major local sponsors. Here are 10 historic facts about this sensational reggae festival.

  1. Rebel Salute was first staged at Fayor’s Entertainment Centre, Mandeville, on January 14, 1994 as a celebration of Tony Rebel’s birthday (January 15).
  2. Rebel Salute used to be a one-night-only event, but as patronage increased, the organisers saw its potential to pull more people over two days and to promote reggae consciousness and livity.
  3. Rebel Salute’s venue was moved to Brooks Park (also in Manchester), then to St Elizabeth, before settling at its current location at Plantation Cove in St Ann.
  4. The festival employs the slogan ‘For the preservation of reggae,’ and has a pretty clean image. The organisers prohibit the selling and drinking of alcohol and the consumption of all forms of meat – only fish is allowed. There is also a strict policy against profanity and certain types of lyrics.
  5. In 2013, the Jamaica Tourist Board (JTB) did a survey at Rebel Salute, which came up with the result that over 38 per cent of the population was people who flew in for the festival.
  6. In 2013, Rebel Salute was billed as having the highest number of tourists in its audience of any music festival in Jamaica.
  7. According to Rebel Salute’s organiser, Tony Rebel: “The reason for trying to keep a holistic show, a positive contribution to the nation and our people, to maintain a legacy created by great people like Bob Marley, Jimmy Cliff, Bunny Wailer I expect that kind of support.”
  8. In 2018, Rebel Salute celebrated 25 years with a show that included Jah Vinci, Third World, Cocoa Tea, Ras Takura, Bushman, Jesse Royal, JC Lodge, Bugle, Agent Sasco, Barrington Levy, Freddie McGregor, Capleton, Sanchez, Oniel Bryan (Elephant Man), Duane Stephenson, and Pinchers, among others.
  9. The Herb Curb was introduced in 2016 as a place where seminars and information on marijuana was shared. Patrons are allowed to carry permitted amounts of marijuana in accordance with Jamaican law, with designated areas for smoking in the Herb Curb.
  10. A staple of the festival is performances from dancehall performers, using their birth names instead of their stage names, giving them an opportunity to show their “good side”, according to Tony Rebel.

Source: Rebel Salute Holds Visitor Record – Organisers Believe Figures Now Higher Than 2013 Survey

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. George Quallo wasn’t fired
  2. Opposition against attempts to remove Quallo
  3. Athletes need suport – JAAA boss
  4. 11 injured, 2 dead after truck crashes into ditch
  5. Portland residents marooned, crisis worsens
  6. More sentence reduction days coming

George Quallo

1. George Quallo wasn’t fired

The tenure of Commissioner of Police George Quallo could be hanging in the balance despite him refuting reports circulating in the media that he is being pressured to resign. News began making the rounds that Quallo is to hand in his resignation letter, following a meeting yesterday morning with National Security Minister Robert Montague to discuss the the rampant murder rate. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Opposition against attempts to remove Quallo

Opposition Spokesman on National Security, Fitz Jackson, says the parliamentary Opposition is strongly against any attempt to remove Police Commissioner George Quallo. Jackson says Quallo has demonstrated competence in the job and loyalty to the Jamaica Constabulary Force. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Athletes need support – JAAA boss

With his administration spending over $19 million towards athlete welfare during the last fiscal year, President of the Jamaica Athletics Administrative Association (JAAA), Dr Warren Blake is calling for the Government’s assistance in helping the country’s less-supported athletes in their preparation and development. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. 11 dead, 2 dead after truck crashes into ditch

Two Clarendon men lost their lives when the truck they were travelling in crashed into a ditch on the Mandela Highway in St Catherine today. The deceased have been identified as: 75-year-old Winston Powell, a farmer of Copperwood district and 34-year-old Hubert Williams – a labourer of Chapelton district, both in Clarendon. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Portland residents marooned, crisis worsens

With expectant mothers unable to reach hospital to give birth, in addition to several other emergencies, a crisis situation is brewing among residents at Cornwall Barracks in the Rio Grande Valley of Portland, who, up to yesterday, were marooned. The unease among the approximately 1,500 residents is getting more and more intense following three days of torrential rainfall, which left the roadway leading into Cornwall Barracks impassable to vehicular and pedestrian traffic after a massive landslide last week Friday morning. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. More sentence reduction days coming

Undaunted by criticisms, Chief Justice Zaila McCalla has unveiled plans to expand the controversial Sentence Reduction Day initiative to four other parishes during the first quarter of this year. Sentence Reduction Day allows accused persons to plead guilty and become eligible for up to a 50 per cent discount on their punishment. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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