6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Schoolboy scorned
  2. Wickedness in the West
  3. Protestors angry over Marcus’ bust
  4. End of an era: Portia leaves Gordon House
  5. Judges going too far?
  6. Relay for Life needs sponsorship

1. Schoolboy scorned

The Ministry of Education says it will find a school for a teenage boy who has been at home since last November when he was acquitted of sexual-abuse charges. “I’m really sad that his mother has got the runaround because the ministry’s responsibility is to find another school to put him,” Grace McLean, chief education officer at the ministry, told The Sunday Gleaner. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Wickedness in the West

Head of the police operations in western Jamaica, Assistant Commissioner of Police Warren Clarke, is blaming the culture and the penchant for lawlessness in that section of the island on issues which have existed for decades. “For many years, western Jamaica has been afflicted by unstructured communities that produce and nurture criminals and gangs. Unstructured communities are the by-products of development all over the world, where industries boom, leaving the personal circumstances of labour behind,” said Clarke. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Protestors angry over Marcus’ bust

The controversial bust of National Hero Marcus Garvey at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, was heavily guarded by security personnel yesterday as protesters unhappy with the look of the sculpture took to nearby Papine to make public their displeasure. One security guard, who requested anonymity, told The Gleaner that the increase in security was intended to safeguard against any eventuality, given the anger displayed by some of the protesters. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Portia Simpson Miller

4. End of an era: Portia leaves Gordon House

From early in her political career, Portia Simpson Miller signaled that she was no pushover, exhibiting a kind of resolve and determination that suggested she would do anything necessary to defend the rights of the people who elected her to represent them in Parliament. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Judges going too far?

A ruling by the nation’s highest court that overstaying in Jamaica is not among the list of offences for which an individual can be deported has triggered concerns that parish court judges have, for years, been overstepping their authority. The landmark decision was handed down in the Court of Appeal last Thursday in the case of a United States citizen, Kwane Abayomi, who pleaded guilty in July 2015 to overstaying his time in the island. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Relay for Life needs sponsorship

The Jamaica Cancer Society’s Relay For Life has been rescheduled for Saturday, July 1, 2017, at the Police Officers’ Club, Hope Road, St Andrew. The 15th staging of the fundraising event, which was originally scheduled for Saturday, June 17, was postponed as a result of inclement weather. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Manhunt for 2 J’cans in Cayman
  2. Denbigh danger?
  3. Ja vote on OAS Venezuela issue stays secret
  4. #SOAReview: Boys need protection too -JFJ
  5. JN Bank discontinues some bank fees
  6. Labour laws biased against men?

1. Manhunt for 2 J’cans in Cayman

The Police in the Cayman Islands have launched a manhunt for two Jamaican men following a ganja bust. The police today identified them as 43-year-old Garth Stewart and 26-year-old Jerome Calbert. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Denbigh danger?

This year’s staging of the annual Denbigh Agricultural, Industrial and Food Show hangs in the balance pending the outcome of a meeting this morning between a team from the Clarendon Health Department and the organisers, the Jamaica Agriculture Society (JAS), over public health safety breaches at the showground. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Ja vote on OAS Venzuela issue stays secret

The Foreign Ministry has been silent so far on Jamaica’s voting position on the failed Venezuela resolution pushed by the United States and Mexico at this week’s Organisation of American States (OAS) General Assembly. The situation has also showed how deep the divisions in CARICOM are over how the countries of the Americas should respond to the political and economic crisis gripping the South American country being led by Nicol·s Maduro. More than 70 people have been reportedly killed in anti-government protests. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. #SOAReview: Boys need protection too – JFJ

Jamaica has a law that protects children from aggravated assault. Girls get that protection for their entire childhood. For boys, however, the protection stops at age 13, and human-rights lobby Jamaicans for Justice (JFJ) says that it is just plain discrimination and should be changed. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. JN Bank discontinues some banks fees

With local commercial banks continuing to face criticisms over the fees they charge depositors JN Bank has become the latest to announce the discontinuation of some of the charges. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Labour laws biased against men?

University lecturer Dr Orville Taylor has charged that labour laws in Jamaica are gender-biased and contribute negatively to the role Jamaican fathers play in the lives of their children. Taylor, the head of the Sociology Department at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, made the claim during his presentation at the Daddy Matters workshop, held on Sunday, which was celebrated as Fathers’ Day. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Big bill for gunshots
  2. Water woes in several communities
  3. Ja’s first solar-powered generation plant powered up
  4. What next after graduation
  5. No social workers at KPH
  6. Man allegedly attacked after setting fire to school

1. Big bill for gunshots

Crime and violence have not only posed a serious threat to the security of Jamaicans, with an average of 28 murders per week and 672 killings up to June 17 this year, but taxpayers are paying a high price for gun conflicts. The Kingston Public Hospital (KPH) alone is spending an estimated $400,000 a day to treat victims of gunshot wounds. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Water woes in several communities

The National Water Commission (NWC) has indicated that some of its customers are now without regular water supply as a result of various challenges being experienced at some of its facilities in some parishes. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Ja’s first solar-powered generation plant powered up

The island’s first solar power generation plant was officially commissioned into operation this morning, in southern Clarendon. Located in Content District, the $7.9 billion facility is expected to produce 20 megawatts annually for supply directly to the Jamaica Public Service Company (JPS) grid. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. What next after graduation?

Thousands of Jamaican teenagers, the majority of them between 16 and 18 years old, have now completed their Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) exams. Several thousands will go on to sixth form in September; however, most will not. If for no other reason, the various sixth forms across the country simply cannot accommodate the number of students who will graduate from the system after five years of secondary education, qualified or not. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. No social workers at KPH

Executive Director of the Violence Prevention Alliance, Dr Elizabeth Ward, is lamenting the absence of social workers at the Kingston Public Hospital (KPH), where it’s reported that the country’s violence problem is costing an estimated $400,000 a day to treat victims. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Man allegedly attacked after setting fire to school

A man said to be of unsound mind has been taken into protective custody after he was allegedly attacked by residents of Arcadia in St Thomas who claimed he set fire to a school in the community, last night. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Judges get pay increase
  2. 5 of most wanted arrested, charged
  3. Still awaiting cholera test results
  4. No confirmed cholera in Ja – MOH
  5. Global immigration card coming for J’cans living overseas
  6. Eight shortlisted in NMIA divestment bid

1. Judges get pay increase

The salary increases over which the island’s judges had threatened to take legal action are to be paid this month end. The order signed on June 12 by finance minister Audley Shaw to implement the new rates was tabled in the House of Representatives this afternoon. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Five of most wanted arrested, charged

National Security Minister Robert Montague has disclosed that five of Jamaica’s most wanted men have been arrested and charged. Montague who refused to name the men, because of ongoing investigations, said information provided by the public to the police resulted in the men being caught. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Still awaiting cholera test results

The country will have to wait a while longer for confirmation that a patient who displayed symptoms similar to the dreaded Cholera does not have the disease. The Ministry of Health says it’s still awaiting results from a stool sample sent for testing to the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) in Trinidad. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. No confirmed cholera in Ja – MOH

The Ministry of Health says there is no confirmed case of cholera in Jamaica. In a release the Health Ministry says on June 9, it was notified of a patient with abdominal pain and fever. It says routine investigations identified a bacteria in the patient’s blood which is not consistent with the severe diarrhoeal illness known as cholera. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Global immigration card coming for J’cans living overseas

The Foreign Affairs Ministry has announced that it will soon complete the design for a global immigration card for Jamaicans living overseas. Under-Secretary for Diaspora Protocol and Consular Affairs in the ministry, Ambassador Sharon Saunders, says it will allow Jamaicans with foreign passports to join the line for residents when they come through the local airports, among other benefits. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Eight shortlisted in NMIA divestment bid

Eight entities have been selected to bid for the divestment of the Norman Manley International Airport. The Development Bank of Jamaica says the Request for Proposal will now be issued to the firms, which will be allowed to conduct due diligence to support the preparation and submission of their bids. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Body found in McCooks Pen Canal
  2. 40,000 more speeding tickets issued by police so far
  3. Cops nab most wanted ‘Dreama’
  4. JPS plans storage facility to reduce power outages
  5. More security for St James Parish Court
  6. Caribbean disaster agency monitoring flood events in Ja

1. Body found in McCooks Pen Canal

Investigators from the St Catherine North Police Division are now at a canal in McCooks Pen, St Catherine where the body of a man was found this morning. Reports are that about 7 a.m. residents stumbled upon the body and summoned the police. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. 40,000 more speeding tickets issued by police so far

The Traffic Division of the Jamaica Constabulary Force is reporting that the number of speeding tickets issued up to June 9 this year is 21 percent more than for the similar period last year. It says traffic cops issued 233,309 speeding tickets or 40,048 more than they did up to June 9 last year. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Cops nab most wanted ‘Dreama’

One of Jamaica’s most wanted is now behind bars and could be charged with murder by tomorrow. He has been identified as 36-year-old Audley Duvall otherwise called ‘Dreama’, of Boscobel Housing Scheme in St Mary. Duvall was listed as wanted at a press conference at the Office of the Commissioner of Police on Tuesday, June 13.  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. JPS plans storage facility to reduce power outages

Power utility Jamaica Public Service Company (JPS) plans to build a 24.5-megawatt facility to store energy as a safeguard against power outages. It’s described as the first of its kind in the Caribbean. JPS plans to build the facility next year, but no cost was disclosed up to press time. It will act like a giant battery that charges when solar- or wind-energy plants generate energy. It then kicks into action, the less power these renewable plants generate due to cloud cover or low wind speeds. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. More security for St James Parish Court

Head of Operations for the St James Police, Deputy Superintendent, Gary McKenzie, says the police will be paying closer attention to potential threats to defendants who attend the St James Parish Court. The commitment follows an incident last Friday in which a man was shot and killed moments after leaving the courthouse. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Caribbean disaster agency monitoring floods events in Ja

Ronald Jackson, head of the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA), said that his organisation has taken on a ‘monitoring’ role in light of recent flood events that have severely impacted Jamaica. The island experienced severe flooding on the weekend following sustained rainfall. It was the second event in about a month. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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Sickle Cell and Jamaica: Five Major Milestones

Sickle cell disease. Many people may not be aware of it’s prevalence, but it is estimated that 1.8 in every 1,000 persons in the Jamaican population has sickle cell disease, 300 Jamaican babies are born annually with the disease, and 10% of the Jamaican population carries the sickle cell trait. According to the World Health Organisation, overall, five per cent of the world’s population carries the sickle cell trait. Here are five important dates in the development of treatment or awareness of the sickle cell disease in Jamaica.

October 1992: Camille Daley started the Sickle Cell Support Club of Jamaica. The group was the first of its kind to target sickle cell patients specifically with support, while raising awareness of the disease.

March 11, 2015: A machine for screening sickle cell, a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) machine, was acquired by the Jamaican Government through a technical cooperation project between Brazil and Jamaica. The machine was handed over by the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) to the Sickle Cell Unit, located at the Tropical Medical Research Institute on the grounds at the University of the West Indies.

April 2015: The Sickle Cell Support Club rebranded itself. New name? Sickle Cell Support Foundation of Jamaica (SCSFJ). The switch from club to foundation would enable the group greater access to funding from donors to support its work.

June 30, 2015: It was announced by then health minister Dr Fenton Ferguson that sickle cell disease had been added to the list of chronic conditions covered by the National Health Fund (NHF), with a $211 million allocated for subsidies on medication for the treatment of the disease.

June 2016: At the American Thoracic Society International conference in San Francisco, Jamaican medical practitioner, Dr Anya McLaren, received the prestigious Paediatrics Scientific Abstract Award from the American Thoracic Society (ATS) for her research in sickle cell disease – specifically for her research on the effects of the drug hydroxyurea on pulmonary function decline in children with sickle cell disease.

 

Sources:
http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/news/20160610/jamaican-doc-wins-sickle-cell-research-award

Government Acquires Machine for Sickle Cell Screening


http://www.sicklecellfoundationja.org/2015/08/13/sickle-cell-disease-now-covered-by-nhf/
http://www.sicklecellfoundationja.org/2015/08/13/relaunched-sickle-cell-foundation-aims-to-increase-support/

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Education ministry confident about PEP
  2. Pay with your lives?
  3. Reid considering ‘Time Out’ facilities
  4. Golding slams Gonsalves over Venezuela crisis
  5. ‘Salacious headlines’ threatening tourism
  6. Dacres grabs first Diamond League win

Ruel Reid

1. Education ministry confident about PEP

With only a year left before the Ministry of Education replaces the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) with the much-anticipated Primary Exit Profile (PEP), the preparation for transition is on in earnest, and further details have emerged on how students will be tested, graded and subsequently placed in high schools. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Pay with your lives?

In the face of a 19 per cent spike in murders since the start of the year, there is a strong suggestion coming from an opposition lawmaker that the condemned practice of hanging should resume to face down the crime monster in Jamaica. Ian Hayles, member of parliament (MP) for Western Hanover, seemingly frustrated by the bloodletting in the parish, contends that talking has not helped in the fight against crime. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Reid considering ‘Time Out’ facilities

Minister of Education Ruel Reid said the Government is prepared to take disruptive students from the regular school system and place them in what he is proposing as ‘Time Out’ facilities. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Golding slams Gonsalves over Venezuela crisis

Jamaica’s decision to participate in discussions at the Organisation of American States (OAS) – whose general assembly starts today – over the Venezuela situation is “correct”, former Prime Minister Bruce Golding has said, as he chides opposing CARICOM leaders for their “foolish” position. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. ‘Salacious headlines’ threatening tourism

Minister of Tourism Edmund Bartlett says Jamaica is at a delicate crossroad where the media will have to decide whether a culture of “read while you bleed” should take precedence over the national good. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Dacres grabs first Diamond League win

World-leading discus thrower Fedrick Dacres kept his good momentum in 2017 going with his first IAAF Diamond League meet win, as he claimed the Stockholm leg with a throw of 68.36m yesterday. Dacres, who threw the third-farthest distance so far this season yesterday, managed to get one over on hometown favourite Daniel Stahl, who had previously beaten him in the Oslo leg of the Diamond League on Thursday, but finished second yesterday with a distance of 68.13m. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. No immediate shift to zoning of schools – Reid
  2. Holness seeks understanding for budgetary dilemma in fight against crime
  3. Health Department concerned about sewage in Rio Cobre
  4. Man convicted of murder
  5. Patrick Powell begs for mercy
  6. Another Hanover killing

Ruel Reid

1. No immediate shift to zoning of schools – Reid

A proposed formal policy for the zoning of secondary schools will not be in place for the 2019 implementation of the Primary Exit Profile (PEP), which is slated to replace the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT), stated Ruel Reid, minister of education, youth and information. See full story on The Gleaner website.

2. Holness seeks understanding for budgetary dilemma in fight against crime

Prime Minister Andrew Holness is urging Jamaicans to accept that less money will ultimately be spent in some areas as funds are reallocated to fight the massive crime problem now facing the nation. “If gangs or crews are your most critical threat, then shouldn’t you make allocations from your Budget to reflect [that]? That is the problem politicians face. How to convince the public that the threats that are critical to them should align to the budgetary allocation,” Holness said. See full story on The Gleaner website.

3. Health Department concerned about sewage in Rio Cobre

The St Catherine Health Department is warning persons along the Rio Cobre to avoid coming into contact with the water due to the continued presence of raw sewage from a National Water Commission (NWC) plant. Acting Chief Public Health Inspector for St Catherine, Grayson Hutchinson, says the NWC is yet to complete repairs to broken sewage mains connected to its De La Vega Oxidation Ponds. See full story on The Gleaner website.

4. Man convicted of murder

A St Catherine man who doused his ex-girlfriend, Sanchez Clayton, with gasoline then set her on fire after showing up at her home to see her with another man has been convicted of murder. A seven-member jury voted unanimously to find Christopher Locke, 39, guilty of the gruesome killing, which took place in Portmore, St Catherine in October 2011. See full story on The Gleaner website.

5. Patrick Powell begs for mercy

Three times yesterday, businessman Patrick Powell insisted that he did not refuse a request by police investigators in 2007 to hand over his licensed Glock pistol and ammunition for inspection. Instead, Powell said that when the request was made of him by Superintendent Clive Walker, he chose to invoke his right to remain silent. See full story on The Gleaner website.

6. Another Hanover killing

Blood continued to flow with impunity in crime-plagued Hanover as rampaging gunmen snuffed out yet another life on Wednesday night. The latest killing brings to five the number of persons brutally murdered in the parish since Tuesday. See full story on The Gleaner website.

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6 Illustrated Jamaican Proverbs

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Whistleblowers needed
  2. No ease in St James bloodletting
  3. Slow justice not our fault – McCalla
  4. Jamaicans received $2.2.b in remittances last year
  5. New National Standard Curriculum for education
  6. Public input invited on special operation zones bill

1. Whistleblowers needed

Despite at least two dedicated telephone systems where persons can call anonymously and report cases of corruption, Jamaicans are staying silent and not blowing the whistle. The Major Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Agency (MOCA) and the Office of the Contractor General (OCG) both operate secure and confidential telephone lines, where persons can report acts of dishonesty, but they are just not ringing as often as expected in a country where the practice is rampant. See full story on The Gleaner website.

2. No ease in St James bloodletting

Twenty-four-year-old Nicholas Smith, otherwise called ‘Junior’ of Birch Hill and a man who is yet to be identified have become the latest murder victims in St James. In one incident Smith was fatally shot and a woman left nursing gunshot wounds after they were attacked by gunmen. Reports from the Mount Salem Police are that about 5:15 Wednesday the two were at Smith’s house when the door was kicked in by armed men who opened fire hitting the two. See full story on The Gleaner website.

3. Slow justice not out fault – McCalla

Chief Justice Zaila McCalla has moved to defend the judiciary following complaints from Police Commissioner George Quallo about the length of time it is taking to move cases through the court. At a media briefing on Tuesday Quallo expressed frustration at the snail’s pace at which Jamaica’s judicial system operates as he noted that it takes an average of seven years for matters to be ventilated in court. See full story on The Gleaner website.

4. Jamaicans received $2.2b in remittances last year

Jamaicans living abroad sent home US$2.2 billion to their families in remittances last year. This is an increase of US$65.5 million  when compared to 2015. The 2016 Economic and Social Survey notes that this represented the seventh consecutive year in which remittances increased following the adverse impact of the global financial and economic crisis on Jamaica’s remittances in 2009. See full story on The Gleaner website.

5. New National Standards curriculum for education

Education Minister Senator Ruel Reid says the new National Standards Curriculum (NSC) will improve the performance of boys in the education system as it seeks to overhaul teaching methods in schools. Senator Reid says the NSC will allow for teachers to customise the learning experience based on the needs of particular sets of students. See full story on The Gleaner website.

6. Public input invited on special operation zones bill

A Joint Select Committee of Parliament reviewing the Bill to establish special security operations zones is inviting members of the public to give their opinions on the draft legislation. Submissions must be made in writing by June 20. See full story on The Gleaner website.

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