6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Respect Ja democratic process, Holness tells gay advocates
  2. Ashe marks 25 yrs with 25 free gigs
  3. Miguel Diez-Canal next Cuba President
  4. Ja track & field safe – Grange
  5. Portland water shortage – NWC
  6. Beware falling boulders at Bog Walk Gorge – NWA

Holness

1. Respect Ja democratic process, Holness tells gay advocates

In an apparent push-back against pressures from some gay lobby groups and pro-gay countries that are frustrated by the slow pace at which Jamaica is moving to secure the rights of LGBT people, Prime Minister Andrew Holness has appealed for respect for the Jamaican people as the issues are ventilated in the society. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Ashe celebrates 25 yrs with 25 free gigs

In celebration of its silver anniversary as Jamaica’s most prominent performing arts company, Ashe will count 25 years with 25 free performances throughout the year. With this philanthropic move, ASHE put out a call to institutions hosting fund-raising events, at which they would give a complimentary demonstration of the troupe’s talents. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Miguel Diez-Canal is next Cuba President

Cuba on Wednesday selected 57-year-old First Vice-President Miguel Mario Diaz-Canel Bermudez as sole candidate to succeed Ra?l Castro as president of Cuba, the centrepiece of an effort to ensure that the country’s single-party system outlasts the ageing revolutionaries who created it. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

Olivia Grange

4. Ja track & field safe – Grange

Sports Minister Olivia Grange has said that Jamaica’s performance at the recently concluded Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia, demonstrates that the country is expanding its reach in athletics. Grange, who was at the Norman Manley International Airport on Tuesday night to welcome home members of the team, was making reference to the impressive display in non-traditional events like the men’s discus throw, women’s shot put, and women’s 3000m steeplechase. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Portland water shortage – NWC

The National Water Commission (NWC) is reporting that it is to regulate water supplied to sections of Portland because of a significant fall in inflows to its Grants Level system in the parish. The NWC says the water supply schedule is to alleviate service disruptions to a number of areas served by the facility. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Beware falling boulders at Bog Walk Gorge – NWA

The National Works Agency (NWA) has issued a statement advising motorists to exercise extreme caution while traversing the Bog Walk Gorge in St Catherine due to falling boulders. The NWA says a team is now being mobilised to remove a boulder which fell on the road this morning. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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What is the Windrush Generation and why does it matter to Jamaica?

 

What is the Windrush Generation?

The Windrush Generation are the thousands of Caribbean migrants invited to Britain between 1948 and the early 1970s to help rebuild the nation after World War II. Commonwealth citizens living in the United Kingdom (UK) had been granted indefinite leave to remain based on provisions in the 1971 Immigration Act.

Changes in UK law in 2012 and 2014, however, demanded that these persons prove they had the right to remain in Britain by providing documentary evidence. Without this proof, access to key social services – work, property rental, driving licenses, healthcare – is being withheld. Many legitimate citizens were caught up in a clampdown in recent times to identify an influx of illegal immigrants. Why?

  1. Many descendants of Windrush immigrants travelled to the UK as children on their parents’ passports and never bothered to apply for their own documents. As a result, they are finding it difficult to  produce the paperwork or documentation which proves that they are legal residents.
  2. The UK Home Office did not record or document the persons who were granted leave to remain in the country under the 1971 Immigration Act. So now it’s difficult to differentiate between those who have the right to be there, and those who do not.
  3. Compounding matters, the ‘landing cards’ of Windrush immigrants were destroyed in 2010 by the Home Office. Speculation regarding the motives for this has sparked furor in pro-immigrant communities. Thrice-changed explanations of why these documents were destroyed have only exacerbated the issue. David Lammy, son of Trinidadian immigrants and a Labour MP, has been campaigning for justice to be served to Windrush immigrants and their descendants:

Why the name ‘Windrush’?

The name ‘Windrush’ is a direct reference to the ship MV Empire Windrush, which, according to the BBC, arrived at Tilbury Docks, Essex, on 22 June 1948, bringing workers from Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and other islands, as a response to post-war labour shortages in the UK.

According to the BBC:

It is unclear how many people belong to the Windrush generation, since many of those who arrived as children travelled on parents’ passports and never applied for travel documents – but they are thought to be in their thousands.

There are now 500,000 people resident in the UK who were born in a Commonwealth country and arrived before 1971 – including the Windrush arrivals – according to estimates by Oxford University’s Migration Observatory.

The following is an excerpt from an editorial piece published in the Gleaner of June 24, 1948, about the workers from Jamaica who were part of the Windrush expedition. It called the invitation from British government to West Indian labourers a ‘dangerous precedent’. Has history proven these words right?

Excerpt courtesy of the Gleaner Archives, from the June 24, 1948 publication.

Why does this matter to Jamaica?

Majority of the Commonwealth citizens who arrived as Windrush immigrants were from Jamaica. Currently, Jamaicans account for 15,000 of the 57,000 non-UK nationals living in the country. They all form part of the Jamaican diaspora, and what happens to them should matter to – and will directly and indirectly affect – the wider Jamaican community.

The legality: Windrush Immigrants were granted indefinite leave to remain under the 1971 Immigration Act. They have a legal right to be in the UK.

Unfair social upheaval: Now think about the level of upheaval that these immigrants must be undergoing. Imagine living in a country all your life, only to hear that if you can’t prove that you belong there, they are shipping you off to another country with which you have no immediate ties,  since you have never lived there? Especially when you know you are legal, but cannot prove it because of the nature of your arrival and the circumstances thereafter?

Deportation: Attempts to clamp down on Windrush immigrants and their descendants – especially attempts to deport them back to their home countries – means  that the country would be seeing an inordinately large percentage of deportees arriving on our shores unexpectedly.

Remittances: Jamaicans also depend on their foreign relatives in the diaspora for financial assistance, normally in the form of remittances. What does it mean for the country if these persons, their lifestyles and livelihoods, are suddenly in question and at peril?

Why is this in the international spotlight?

At a meeting of Commonwealth Heads of States with the UK government at Downing Street on April 17, 2018, Prime Minister Theresa May apologised to Caribbean leaders for the controversy surrounding the threats of deportation and pressures facing immigrants and descendants of  the Windrush Generation. This apology was especially ironic since it was May, as Head of Home Security, who oversaw the changes in 2012 that led to the crackdown which spawned this controversy.

 

Sources:
Seek Justice! Windrush Generation urged to contest deportation
Windrush Generation: Who are they and why are they facing problems?

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Class action lawsuit looms over SOE
  2. Public defender under fire for wanting end to SOE
  3. Windrush gen urged to contest deportation
  4. Gov’t thinking on next move re UC Rusal
  5. Knutsford Express profits dip amid SOE
  6. Ja bid to host Commonwealth Games?

1. Class action lawsuit looms over SOE

Junior doctors at the Cornwall Regional Hospital (CRH) have indicated that they will pursue a class-action suit against the Government regarding the unhealthy environment at the western Jamaica hospital. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Public Defender under fire for wanting end to SOE

The Police High Command has said that the “greatest area of concern being aired by citizens is the premature ending” of the state of public emergency in St James. Reacting to a recent call by Public Defender Arlene Harrison Henry for the ending of the state of emergency, the Police High Command asserted that the “measure has proven to be effective and has saved at least 54 lives since its inception”. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Windrush generation urged to seek justice contest deportation

Jamaicans and other Caribbean nationals dubbed the Windrush Generation who have been aggrieved by the actions of the United Kingdom (UK) government should immediately take steps to seek redress, advised Diana Baxter, solicitor in Britain. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Gov’t deliberating move on UC Rusal

Minister of Transport and Mining Robert Montague should be in a position to address growing concerns regarding the implications of Jamaica’s engagement with United Company (UC) Rusal, Russian operator of West Indies Alumina Company (WINDALCO), following the imposition of sanctions by the United States (US), after he is briefed this week. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Knutsford Express profits dip amid SOE

Knutsford Express Services Limited underperformed financially during its third quarter ending February, for which the luxury bus company places some blame on the crime-control measures in St James, where it now operates two depots. Revenue grew in the quarter by 14 per cent to $231.7 million but the company, which operates various bus routes cross-country, had expected better outcomes. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Ja bid to host Commonwealth Games?

Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Olivia Grange, revealed last night that serious discussions are taking place to bring back the Commonwealth Games to Jamaica. Jamaica hosted the Games in 1966 and remain the only Caribbean nation to date to have done so.  See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Public defender insists St James SOE must end
  2. Another major counterfeit bust downtown
  3. Kathryn Phipps ambassador designate to Cuba
  4. Bunting was compelled to act?
  5. Plans afoot to boost farm output
  6. Fresh calls for franchise football

1. Public defender insists St James SOE must end

Arlene Harrison Henry, the nation’s public defender, wants the state of public emergency in St James to come to a rapid end, as she believes it has failed to achieve its targets and is a means of detaining youth unlawfully. The Gleaner spoke to Harrison Henry at her office in downtown Kingston yesterday, and she bemoaned the undesirable circumstances many innocent residents of St James have had to endure. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Another major counterfeit bust downtown

Officers from the Counter-Terrorism and Organised Crime Investigation Branch (CTOC) are now conducting a raid at the Coastal City Clothing and Shoes Wholesale store on Barry Street in downtown Kingston. Already, the officers have seized a large number of items said to be counterfeit. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Kathryn Phipps ambassador designate to Cuba

Attorney-at-law Kathryn Phipps has been appointed Ambassador-designate to Cuba. She will succeed Ambassador A’Dale Robinson who will reassume duties at the Foreign Affairs Ministry. Foreign Affairs Minister Kamina Johnson Smith said Phipps has a deep understanding of international law, particularly relating to international trade and organisations within the Caribbean region. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

Peter Bunting

4. Bunting was compelled to act?

The Opposition has issued a release saying former National Security Minister Peter Bunting was compelled to act when he issued certificates of immunity to the three Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) soldiers charged in the Keith Clarke murder. See story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Plans afoot to boost farm output

Following a tour of the Metcalfe Street Juvenile Remand Centre in west Kingston yesterday, State Minister of National Security Rudyard Spencer alluded to plans to ramp up the level of production and productivity at the facility that houses boys waiting to have their cases heard in the courts. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Fresh calls for franchise football

With this season’s top six teams in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) all being based in the Corporate Area, Jamaica Football Federation (JFF) President Michael Ricketts is among those admitting that there is a need to revisit the format of the league to better facilitate widespread development. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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Three Times Jamaica Featured In Beychella

Singer Beyonce and husband Jay Z spotted in Jamaica earlier this year.

It was a historic set from the first black woman to headline the Coachella music festival. Beyonce didn’t just make history; she paid homage to it through an unmatchable performance. The American entertainer turned the April 2018 staging of Coachella into #Beychella, schooling everyone on how to make a comeback after a pregnancy, how to dominate a set featuring over 100 musicians, dancers, family members and the infamous Destiny’s Child. Effortlessly taking her audience through a catalog of hit after hit after hit, she danced, spoke, sang like nobody else can … and in her wake, left them all hailing her as the Greatest Of All Time.

But her set was not just saturated with tributes to black icons like freedom fighter Malcolm X and jazz crooner Nina Simone. It also featured our very own likkle but tallawah island, Jamaica, through at least three songs.

Jamaican rapper Sean Paul

1. Way to bring back ‘Baby Boy’!

It started with Baby Boy. Remember this hit song that was released on Beyonce’s debut solo studio album, Dangerously in Love, in 2003? The song featured Jamaican rapper Sean Paul, and topped the US Billboard Hot 100 charts for nine consecutive weeks. When Bey decided to drop a little bit of that song on her Beychella set, all Jamaicans were already feeling the love. But it was about to get a whole lot more personal.

2. Dawn Penn’s ‘You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No)’

Beyoncé could not have paid a bigger compliment to Jamaica than when she dropped the legendary intro chords to Dawn Penn’s reggae tune, You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No). The most popular version of the song, which has been hailed as a timeless reggae anthem, was released by Penn as a single on February 1994. However, that recording was based on Penn’s earlier recording in 1967. The 1994 version peaked at number three on the UK Singles Chart. Bey’s cover of the song was complimented by some legit dancehall wining as well. But then, she didn’t stop there. She took things up a notch …

3. Sampling Sister Nancy’s ‘Bam Bam’

And it was a bam bam indeed! Because if there was any doubt that this little segment was placing Jamaica in the spotlight, the sampling of sounds from Sister Nancy’s Bam Bam put them all to rest. Sister Nancy’s Bam Bam, released in 1982, has been sampled by Jay Z for his 4:44 track, Bam, and on Kanye West’s The Life of Pablo cut Famous. Three in a row made it clear that Bey was sending out some love to this irie little island, and, we’re sure this inspired a reciprocation of more love for her on this side of the globe.

Sources:
Wikipedia on Dawn Penn
Mic.com on Beychella
The History of Sister Nancy’s Bam Bam

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Young men losing jobs because of SOE detention?
  2. Most wanted gangster killed
  3. Household debt on the rise
  4. Ja-Chile air service agreement coming
  5. Commonwealth Games: Sunshine Girls cop bronze
  6. Fix school tax problem

1. Young men losing jobs because of SOE detentions?

The Reverend Astor Carlyle, pastor of the Webster Memorial Church in St Andrew, has bemoaned the treatment of some detainees in the ongoing state of public emergency in St James, highlighting that many of those picked up by the security forces have jobs and families that may be affected. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Most wanted gangster killed

One of Jamaica’s most wanted men, Ryan Peterkin, more popularly known as ‘Ratty’, was shot and killed during a joint police-military operation in Westmoreland today. The police, in a message posted on Twitter, said one of Ratty’s cronies was also killed in the operation. His identity has not been released. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Household debt on the rise

Jamaican households are increasingly living beyond their means as more than half of their disposable income goes towards paying back loans, a trend that concerns the financial stability committee enough for it to consider studying its drivers. Household debt reached its highest level in a decade, with more than half of disposable income – that is, $54.20 of every $100 – going towards the servicing of personal loans, as at last September, according to the Fiscal Stability Report 2017 released by the central bank this month. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Ja-Chile air service agreement coming

Jamaica and the Republic of Chile are close to signing an air services agreement. A release from the Office of the Prime Minister (OPM) last evening said Prime Minister Andrew Holness and President of the Republic of Chile Sebastian Pinera held bilateral talks yesterday in Lima Peru. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Commonwealth Games: Sunshine Girls cop bronze

Jamaica’s Sunshine Girls defeated New Zealand 60-55 to again secure the bronze medal at the Commonwealth Games on Saturday on Australia’s Gold Coast. The result means that the Sunshine Girls repeated their placing from the 2014 Games in Glasgow, Scotland, and also closed Jamaica’s 2018 medal tally on 27 medals (7 gold, 9 silver, 11 bronze), the most ever won by the island at the Commonwealth Games. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Fix school tax problem – Thwaites

The People’s National Party (PNP) has expressed alarm at what it describes as the disgraceful misplaced priorities of the Ministry of Education and the minister of education which have led to some principals of high schools being prosecuted for non-payment of taxes, as reported in The Sunday GleanerSee full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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7 Silly Jamaican Pickup Lines to Make You Smile

Did your licence get suspended for driving all these guys crazy?

Depending on how you look at it, pick-up lines are either the best inventions of men trying to get the attention of beautiful and attractive women – or the worst. You’ve probably had your own experience with cliche lines from random men while walking along the street, from friends who wanted to pay you a compliment, from admirers and suitors: ‘Aren’t you tired? Cause you’ve been running through my mind all day’, or ‘Are you Wi-Fi? Cause we have a great connection’. Some of them are corny. Some might get a laugh. Some elicit smiles, and some may even be the beginning of far greater things. As usual, Jamaican men make it their duty to outdo the competition. With their unique patois flair, here are some pick-up lines with a Jamaican twist that made us at least chuckle.

And our favourite:

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Michael McLean gets 6 life sentences
  2. Commonwealth Games: Ja sprints ahead
  3. Smart & steady, get climate ready!
  4. Rio Grande rafting under threat
  5. Cubans coming to Ja Expo
  6. Trinidad Court declares buggery illegal

1. Michael McLean gets 6 life sentences

Multiple murder convict Michael McLean, 50, has been sentenced to six life sentences for the 2006 murders of six members of a family in St Thomas. He is to spend 60 years behind bars before he becomes eligible for parole. However, given the 12 years already spent in custody, McLean will only another 48 years before he becomes eligible for parole. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Commonwealth Games: Ja sprints ahead

After winning her heat in the 100m hurdles yesterday, Danielle Williams patted her chest like track and field Legend Usain Bolt did when he won the 100m at the Beijing Olympic Games. Her reserve personality might have prevented her from doing that normally, but after battling a series of injuries this season ,the 25 year was shocked to have registered 12.69 seconds, the fastest time going into the final of the event at these Commonwealth Games today. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

3. Smart & steady, get climate ready

Close to 70 per cent of Jamaicans believe that addressing issues of climate change is the sole responsibility of the Government. Indi Mclymont-Lafayette, communications specialist for the adaptation programme and financing mechanism of the Pilot Programme for Climate Change, said the statistics that were revealed in a 2012 study is a stark signal that work is needed to sensitise citizens about their role in mitigating against the impact of climate change. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Rio Grande rafting under threat

Raft captains assigned to Rio Grande rafting, Portland’s premiere tourists attraction site, have threatened to withdraw their services, which could result in a shutdown of operations at that facility. The irate raft captains are insisting that unless they are allowed to operate after the closure of the ticketing office at the lone raft stand at Berrydale, the industry will be shut down. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Cubans coming to Ja Expo

A delegation of 11 from Cuba will attend Expo Jamaica 2018 – to be held at the National Arena and environs on April 19 – in search of some of the finest products made in Jamaica. At a Gleaner Editors’ forum held yesterday at the company’s North Street offices, Berletta Henlon Forrester, sales and promotions manager at the Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO), announced that for the first time, Cubans would be selecting prospective Jamaican manufacturers with which to do business at the expo. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Trinidad Court declares buggery illegal

The Trinidad and Tobago Constitutional Court has ruled that the buggery law is unconstitutional. High court judge  Devindra Rampersad handed down the ruling this morning in a case brought in March 2017 by an LGBT activist Jason Jones.  See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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Throwback Thursday: Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange in 1986

Current minister of culture, gender, entertainment and sport; and the longest serving sitting female member of Parliament in Jamaica, Olivia Grange has a long and illustrious career in politics. Among her achievements are being crowned CARICOM’s first Champion for Culture in 2009; being a founding member of the Jamaica Association of Composers, Authors and Publishers (JACAP); being awarded the Order of Distinction, in the rank of Commander (CD), for her contribution to the Jamaican Music Industry, Cultural Development and Public Service in 2015; and cofounding Contrast, Canada’s first black community newspaper.

For Throwback Thursday, we look all the way back to 1986, when she was parliamentary secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister, announcing plans at the launch of that year’s staging of Reggae Sunsplash. Enjoy the photo bite!

Photo courtesy of The Gleaner Newspaper Archives.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. ZOSOs extended for 60 days
  2. Commonwealth Games: More medals for Ja
  3. Finance Minister addresses Gov’t multimillion spend on luxury vehicles
  4. Keith Clarke fam disappointed by murder trial delays
  5. Renovated Chapelton Family Court opens
  6. Ebenezer Home for mentally ill, homeless faces closure

1. ZOSOs extended for 60 days

The House of Representatives this afternoon approved 60-day extensions of the Zones of Special Operations (ZOSOs) in Mount Salem, St James and in Denham Town, Kingston. “There have been no reports of major crimes, no abuse by the security forces, and the residents continue to cooperate with the security forces,” said Prime Minister Andrew Holness in relation to Mount Salem. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

2. Commonwealth Games: More medals for Ja

Shericka Jackson took the silver medal in the women’s 200m; Janieve Russell secured gold in the women’s 400m, while Jaheel Hyde copped a bronze in the men’s equivalent at the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia . See full stories on the Gleaner’s website: Jackson & Elaine Thompson, Russell & Hyde

Nigel Clarke

3. Finance Minister addresses multimillion Gov’t spend on luxury vehicles

Finance Minister Dr Nigel Clarke this afternoon in Parliament described as incorrect a Sunday Gleaner article which stated that the Andrew Holness administration has spent $190 million on luxury vehicles. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

4. Keith Clarke fam disappointed by murder trial delays

The family of slain businessman Keith Clarke is disappointed that the murder trial of the three Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) soldiers accused of killing him has again been delayed, their attorney has revealed. Corporal Odel Buckley, Lance Corporal Greg Tingling and Private Arnold Henry, were scheduled to go on trial on Monday for shooting Clarke 21 times inside his Kirkland Close, St Andrew home on May 27, 2010. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

5. Renovated Chapelton Family Court open

Residents of Chapelton and neighbouring communities in Clarendon now have a newly renovated Family Court, which was refurbished with funds provided by the European Union (EU) and government of Canada. The facility, which is located at the Chapelton courthouse, was officially opened last week by Justice Minister Delroy Chuck and Chief Justice Bryan Sykes. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

6. Ebenezer Home for mentally ill, homeless faces closure

The Manchester-based Ebenezer Home for the mentally challenged and the homeless, which focuses on treating and rehabilitating individuals and placing them back into their communities or with families, has fallen on hard times and could close its doors as early as May if it doesn’t receive much-needed assistance. See full story on the Gleaner’s website.

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