6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. More PEP prep
  2. Fee not required for overseas jobs
  3. Shaw wants to grow mother farm initiative
  4. Two charged in multiagency money laundering probe
  5. Ja elected to UN ECOSOC
  6. J’can imprisoned in Cayman

Ruel Reid

1. More PEP prep

Education Minister Ruel Reid has assured principals and teachers that it’s all systems go for the implementation of the Primary Exit Profile (PEP) by September and that everything will be in place for the new school year. But Reid’s affirmation was not sufficient as teachers raised questions about the time that they have to get more familiar with the new material, telling the minister that they were uncomfortable with PEP because they needed more training. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Fee not required for overseas jobs

Concerned that vulnerable job seekers are being defrauded by some employ-ment agencies, the Ministry of Labour and Social Security has advised that the charging of a fee for job placement under the H-2B programme is prohibited. The ministry said it has taken note of a Sunday Gleaner article, which highlighted the recent attempt by one employment agency to misappropriate money paid by a United States-based company to assist with the processing of documents for Jamaicans selected to work at a number of companies in the US. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Audley Shaw

3. Shaw wants to expand mother farm initiative

Audley Shaw, the minister of industry, commerce, agriculture and fisheries, is expressing a desire to expand the ‘mother farm’ concept, which allows for large companies to enter into partnerships with small and medium farmers to provide them with an avenue to sell their crops. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Two charged in multi-agency money laundering probe

An engineer at the government-owned company National Energy Solutions Limited (NESOL) is one of two persons facing corruption-related charges following a multiagency investigation that culminated with the seizure of more than $30 million in cash and four luxury vehicles last week. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Ja elected to UN ECOSOC

Jamaica was among countries elected on Wednesday, June 13 to serve on the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC) for the 2019-2021 term. Brazil and Paraguay were the other two countries elected in the Latin American and Caribbean regional grouping. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

J’can imprisoned in Cayman

A Jamaican man has been sentenced to six years in prison in the Cayman Islands after he was convicted of wounding with intent for hitting his supervisor on the head with a hammer. According to a report from the Cayman News Service, 33-year-old Dain Damean McPherson was going about his usual work routine when the attack occurred. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Football fever – World Cup is ON!
  2. Most J’cans backing Brazil football team
  3. PM wants Ja to be C’bean tech hub
  4. Car on police compound scrapped
  5. Police officer arrested in connection with stolen car
  6. Portmore councillors scold NSWMA

Neymar

1. Football fever – World Cup is ON!

The World Cup is set to start and finish with games at the opposite ends of the spectrum. The lowest-ranked teams at the tournament will meet in the opener today when Russia hosts Saudi Arabia at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, which is also the venue for the July 15 final. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Most J’cans backing Brazil football team

The magic of Messi and his predecessor, Maradona, as well as the pragmatism of Die Mannschaft, and the ‘tiki-taka’ style have won Argentina, Germany, and Spain, respectively, many local supporters throughout the decades. But once the 21st FIFA World Cup gets under way today in Russia, local football analysts are convinced that the bulk of the sporting fans will still be leaning heavily towards the five-time champions, Brazil. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. PM wants Ja to be C’bean tech hub

Prime Minister Andrew Holness says the Government is committed to making Jamaica the ‘centre of the Caribbean for innovation and technology’. “We want to be the centre of the Caribbean for trade and commerce and logistics, business process outsourcing, agribusiness and energy, and we are working to achieve that,” he said. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Car on police compound scrapped

A top-level probe by the police’s Inspectorate of Constabulary along with the St. Catherine South Police is underway into the scrapping of a motorcar being housed at a police station in the parish. In a statement, the police said the incident happened at the Bridgeport Police Station. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Officer arrested in connection with stolen car

The Jamaica Constabulary Force has arrested a police constable in Falmouth, Trelawny in connection with the theft of a Nissan Tiida motor car from Kingston. The motor vehicle was discovered missing from a Kingston address on Monday morning and a report subsequently made to the Rollington Town Police. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Portmore councillors scold NWSMA

Councillors attending the general meeting of the Portmore Municipal Corporation last night passed a motion for the entity to take back the responsibility for solid waste collection in the sunshine city from the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA). See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Cassava Piece curfew extended to Gregory Park
  2. Simpson Miller, PNP officials granted leave to take Trafigura case to Privy Council
  3. PNP Women’s Movement want probe into neonatal deaths
  4. Money laundering probe yields $30m cash
  5. Start of NIDS court challenge today
  6. ODPEM ready to forcibly move persons living in flood-prone areas

1. Cassava Piece curfew extended to Gregory Park

The police have imposed a curfew in Cassava Piece, Kingston 8 in light of the spate of murders and shootings in the area. The curfew began at 6:00 p.m., Thursday, June 07 and will remain in effect until 6:00 p.m., Saturday, June 09. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Simpson Miller, PNP officials granted leave to take Trafigura case to Privy Council

Former Prime Minister Portia Simpson Miller and other senior officials of the People’s National Party (PNP) in the Trafigura case have been given the go-ahead to take their case to the United Kingdom-based Privy Council. The Court of Appeal, which reserved judgement in February, this morning granted their application for leave to Jamaica’s final court. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. PNP Women’s Movement want probe into neonatal deaths

The People’s National Party Women’s Movement is calling for the Government to urgently and thoroughly investigate the reasons for the significant increase in the number of neonatal deaths in 2017 in public hospitals. While recognising that, despite the trauma to parents and in particular to the mothers, neonatal death is not an unusual occurrence, the Women’s Movement is concerned that public hospitals are seeing an increase in such deaths in one single year. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Money laundering probe yields $30m cash

Over $30 million in cash and a number of high-end motor vehicles were seized during a marathon police operation yesterday, marking the culmination of a high-level, multiagency money-laundering investigation that is pointing to a political figure, law enforcement sources have revealed. One person was taken into custody during the early morning operation in Old Harbour, St Catherine, which lasted all day, sources revealed. According to one source, the suspect was grilled for hours by police investigators. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Start of NIDS court challenge

The first step in the legal battle over sections of the National Identification System (NIDS) Act begins today. Government lawyers and attorneys for the Opposition People’s National Party (PNP) are scheduled to appear before a High Court judge for a case-management hearing to plot the way forward for the highly anticipated legal battle. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. ODPEM ready to forcibly move persons living in flood-prone areas

Persons living in flood-prone and low-lying areas who refuse to move in the event of a hurricane are being warned by Major Clive Davis, director general of the Office of Disaster Preparedness and Emergency Management (ODPEM), that their refusal to leave will trigger their removal by force. “We prefer to do moral suasion. We want to go in; we want to have the discussions; we want people to know their vulnerabilities; and we want people to get up and move because you could die. If they are not moving, we will have to do it,” said Davis. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Nine-y-o girl murdered, 13-y-o boy implicated
  2. Seiveright’s $9m travel bill in 15 months
  3. New buses for pilot LNG programme coming
  4. Contract changes coming for Contender
  5. Dacres hunts glory in Oslo
  6. Queen Nanny visits US Embassy

1. Nine-y-o girl murdered, 13-y-o boy implicated

Tears flowed freely at the New Works Primary School in Westmoreland yesterday as students and teachers reacted with shock and grief to the murder of nine-year-old student Kadijah Saunders, whose body was found in an isolated section of the nearby community of Bog on Tuesday night. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Seiveright’s $9m travel bill in 15 months

While concerns have been raised about the nearly $9 million in travel expenditure for Delano Seiveright, senior communications strategist in the Ministry of Tourism, for a 15-month period spanning February 2017 to May 2018, the man at the centre of the debate has indicated that it was value for money. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. New buses for pilot LNG programme coming

The Transport ministry is in the process of acquiring five new buses to be used in a pilot liquefied natural gas (LNG) project aimed at reducing emission and achieving greater performance on Jamaica’s roads. Transport minister Robert Montague told The Gleaner yesterday that the buses were scheduled to be shipped from China within the next 30 days. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Contract changes coming for Contender

Jamaica Boxing Board of Control (JBBC) general secretary Leroy Brown says that there will be a change to the weigh-in structure for the Wray and Nephew Contender Series in the future. Brown said that a pre-weigh-in will allow the JBBC to closely monitor the weight of fighters heading into competition, to safeguard against them being prevented from competing because of being overweight. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Dacres hunts glory in Oslo

FIVE Jamaicans – Fedrick Dacres, Shanieka Ricketts, Kimberly Williams, Danielle Williams and Aisha Praught – will be in action today at the fifth stage of the IAAF Diamond League series, the Oslo Bislett Games in Norway. Following his impressive showing a week ago in Rome, Dacres who has been unbeaten this season will be hoping to continue his winning ways in the men’s discus. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Queen Nanny visits US Embassy

To sound off the beginning of Caribbean American Heritage Month and its accompanying film festival, the US Embassy hosted a screening of the documentary film Queen Nanny: Legendary Maroon Chieftainess, about Jamaica’s only National Heroine, now ‘supreme leader’ and internationally famous military general and metaphysical figure. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Court remands 22yo murder accused
  2. Over 17,000 added to voter’s list
  3. New curriculum for students with learning disabilities
  4. Man beheaded in Manchester
  5. Police shoot, kill 4, wound 1
  6. Ja has got $1.5b from EU in 4 decades

1. Court remands 22yo murder accused

A 22-year-old labourer, who is accused of killing four persons in Whithorn, Westmoreland three years ago, was remanded when he appeared in the St Elizabeth Circuit Court on Friday. Jevaughn Flemmings is charged with the murder of 21-year-old Theodore Tennant, 20-year-old Romario Drummond, Demar Doeman and a 13-year-old known only as Shawn, all of Old Road in Whithorn. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Over 17,000 added to voter’s list

The Electoral Office of Jamaica (EOJ) is reporting that 17,696 persons have been added to the voters’ list. The May 31, 2018 voters’ list has been published with the names of 1,917,945 registered voters. The EOJ says in addition to the new persons the names of 5,029 who are no longer eligible to vote were removed, including 4,258 deceased electors. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. New curriculum for students with learning disabilities

The Ministry of Education, Youth and Information has developed a new curriculum for students with moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. The document, which replaces the curriculum that was developed by the Jamaica Association on Intellectual Disabilities (JAID), focuses on five main areas: life skills, functional mathematics, language and communication, science, and physical education. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Man beheaded in Manchester

There are reports that a man was beheaded in Manchester last evening by another man believed to be of unsound mind. Police officials have confirmed the incident, but said they are still gathering information. The identity of the slain man has not yet been ascertained. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Police shoot, kill 4, wound 1

Five men were shot, four fatally, by the police during a reported exchange of gunfire in Braeton, Portmore, St Catherine shortly after 4 p.m Friday. Police sources say three illegal firearms have been seized. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Ja has got $1.5b from EU in four decades

Over the last 43 years, Jamaica has benefited from 1.5 billion Euros in development assistance from the European Union (EU). That’s according to head of the EU Delegation to Jamaica, Ambassador Malgorzata Wasilewska, who says the funds are primarily grant resources which have been spread across several sectors with the primary objectives of tackling poverty and achieving sustainable development. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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7 Facts About Hurricanes In Jamaica

The hurricane season lasts from June to November. Jamaica, along with several other Caribbean islands and mainland territories, falls into what is commonly understood to be the Atlantic hurricane belt, meaning that these countries often experience the effects of storm systems during the hurricane season.

How well do you understand hurricanes? Here’s a chance to show off your hurricane knowledge or to quiz your friends on theirs with these 10 trivia questions and answers about hurricanes in Jamaica.

  1. Hurricane Dean ravaged sections of the island, leaving so much destruction in its wake that the government had to declare a two-day state of emergency.
  2. Even though it didn’t make contact, Hurricane Ivan (2004) was the costliest storm in Jamaica’s history, doing extensive damage to the nation’s infrastructure.
  3. On Monday, September 12, 1988, Jamaicans experienced what is perhaps the most notorious hurricane in its history:  Hurricane Gilbert. Damage was estimated at $4 billion, with the damage to agriculture accounting for more than 40 per cent of this total. Forty-five persons reportedly died across the island and more than 800,000 persons sought shelter.
  4. The first recorded hurricane in Jamaica’s history is Hurricane Jig, in 1950. It caused heavy rains and extensive crop damage.
  5. There were 12 recorded hurricanes and tropical storms on the island, from 1950, before the dreaded Hurricane Gilbert of 1988.
  6. Technically, Jamaica has had two hurricanes with the same pronunciation for their names: Hurricane Charlie in 1951 and Hurricane Charley in 2004. The 2004 storm caused one death and JMD$7 million in damages to roads, while the 1951 storm wreaked havoc, causing 154 deaths, 2,000 injuries; leaving over 9,000 left homeless, and destroying 80% of Morant Bay.
  7. Hurricane Cleo, of 1964, caused no major damage to Jamaica. Likewise Hurricane Beulah of 1967.
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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. 158 neonatal deaths July-Sept 2011
  2. Streetcar system revival?
  3. KPH workers interdicted as probe into improper disposal of dead babies deepens
  4. CAS decision upsets Carter
  5. Four die in bike crash
  6. 65% JSPCA rescued animals put down

1. 158 neonatal deaths between July and Sept 2011

The JA KIDS 2011 Birth Cohort study found that there were 158 neonatal deaths between July 1 and September 30, 2011. The data, which was presented today at the JA KIDS conference at the University of the West Indies, Mona campus, showed that 84 were males and 55 females, with the remaining figure accounting for babies whose sex could not be clearly identified. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Streetcar system revival?

The Transport Ministry is to look into the feasibility of reviving trams or streetcars in Kingston. Portfolio Minister Robert Montague has indicated that the Jamaica Railway Corporation has been tasked with the exercise. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. KPH workers interdicted as probe into improper disposal of dead babies deepens

The South East Regional Health Authority (SERHA) is reporting that three employees, including the Mortuary Supervisor, at the Kingston Public Hospital (KPH) have been interdicted as it probes the case of the improper disposal of the remains of neonates stored at the hospital’s morgue. They were sent home today. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. CAS decision upsets Carter

Olympic Games and World Championship 4x100m gold medallist Nesta Carter said that he is deeply upset at the decision of the Court of Arbitration for Sports’ (CAS) decision to disqualify the results of the 4x100m relays at the 2008 Olympic games in Beijing, China. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Four die in bike crash

A popular sound system selector and a renowned photographer were among four persons killed when two speeding motorcycles crashed head-on along the heavily used Nampriel Road in Negril, Westmoreland, on Wednesday night. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. 65% JSPCA rescued animals put down

The Jamaica Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (JSPCA) says that it is forced to humanely end the lives of over 65 per cent of its intake due to health reasons and a lack of resources. “We are going over 7,000 animals that are coming in – cats, dogs, puppies, kittens – per annum. Some years are worse, some years are better. Out of that, we are putting down at least 65 per cent of those animals,” reported Pamela Lawson, managing director of the JSPCA. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Mandatory 10-digit dialing takes effect today
  2. No ceiling on taxi licences
  3. Petrojam operations probe under way
  4. Perfect stage for Gayle
  5. Sygnus doubles uptake from IPO
  6. NCB fixing ABM issues

1. Mandatory 10-digit dialing takes effect today

Starting today, making phone calls will require 10 digits, with the first three being 876 or the newly introduced area code of 658. The Office of Utilities Regulation has said that the additional area code is to ensure that there are sufficient numbers to meet the demand over the next 25 years because the 876 area code that has been in use since 1996 has almost been exhausted. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. No ceiling on taxi licences

The Government has announced its intention to open all public transport routes in Jamaica to competition in a move to overhaul the current regulatory framework governing the licensing of public passenger vehicles. Currently, a technocrat determines the number of taxis and buses that should operate on a route. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Petrojam operations probe under way

Minister of Science, Energy, Technology Andrew Wheatley says he could not confirm that the human resources manager at Petrojam was earning $12 million, nearly twice the sum that was paid to her predecessor. His comments came even as Auditor General Pamela Monroe Ellis is currently conducting an audit at the government-run entity. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Perfect stage for Gayle

While The historic Lord’s will offer the perfect stage for today’s Twenty20 International between West Indies and the ICC World XI, there is only one player likely to provide the box office aura the occasion demands. Superstar opener Chris Gayle, the world’s finest Twenty20 batsman, will suit up for the 6 p.m. (Noon Jamaica time) contest and is expected to be a massive pull as organisers seek to raise funds for five stadia in the Caribbean damaged last September by the passage of Hurricanes Irma and Maria. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Sygnus doubles uptake from IPO

Sygnus Credit Investments Limited upsized its initial public offer from US$10 million to over US$20 million in order to better finance deals its sees in the short term. “Our decision to upsize to US$20 million is based strictly on our assessment of our pipeline and the growing demand for private credit investment by medium-sized firms across various sectors,” said Berisford Grey, CEO of Sygnus Capital, the management company for Sygnus Credit. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. NCB addressing ABM issues

The National Commercial Bank (NCB) says it is addressing issues with some of its automated banking machines (ABMs). The bank says its aware of issues related to downtime and the ability of customers to do some transactions. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

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Calabash 2018 – Lit Up and Woke !

Every two years, Jamaicans young and young-at-heart flock to Jake’s in Treasure Beach for the Calabash International Literary Festival. There’s always something for everyone, no matter their ages or taste, but this year’s staging—from June 1-3—promises to be one of the most exciting for the millennial and Gen Z crowd, especially those who consider themselves ‘woke’ or socially conscious. The Calabash 2018 lineup is peppered with writers from the younger generations whose names will be immediately recognisable by their peers, as well as more seasoned creatives whose work dissects or reflects on hot-button issues like race, gender, injustice, inequality and cultural appropriation. It is fitting that this year’s theme is “Lit Up”, an acknowledgment of the power of words to ignite passions and spur action.

One of the most buzzed-about writers in the line-up this year is Akala, a UK-based BAFTA and MOBO award-winning hip-hop artist, writer and social entrepreneur. His moniker might have been derived from a Buddhist term for ‘immovable’, but Akala, born Kingslee Daley to a Scottish mother and Jamaican father, is a kinetic force behind a mic and in his country’s black community. Known to spit lyrical fire on his albums, EPs and mixtapes and in his epic freestyles, his four ‘Fire in the Booth’ sessions with BBC 1Xtra host Charlie Sloth totals 40-plus minutes of scathing commentary on and deep observations about issues such as racial and social injustice, history and even hip hop culture itself. Co-founder of The Hip-Hop Shakespeare Company and founder of creative production hub, he has also led innovative projects in the arts, education and music across South East Asia, Africa, India, Australia and New Zealand. Akala’s articles and lectures—written for the Guardian, Huffington Post and the Independent, and spoken for the Oxford Union and TEDx—are just as fiery and compelling as his music. His much-anticipated memoir Natives will be launched during ‘Urban(e) Revelators’ on Saturday night.

Akala

Also stoking the fire is Somali-British wordsmith Warsan Shire, who was propelled to global pop culture stardom in 2016 when poetry from her debut pamphlet, Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth (2011), was featured on Beyonce’s visual album Lemonade. Shire, a first-generation immigrant in the UK, writes from her own personal experiences and those of other people to whom she is close, giving voice to those who are generally marginalised, such as refugees. Her poem Home, featuring lines such as “no one leaves home unless/home is the mouth of a shark” and “you have to understand/no one puts their children in a boat/unless the water is safer than the land”, has been hailed as “a rallying call for refugees and their advocates.”

Warsan Shire

Shire will join forces with two other ‘Fierce Flowers’, Safia Elhillo and Safiya Sinclair, to set fire to the stage with their poetry on Saturday night. Elhillo, who is Sudanese by way of Washington, DC, is well known for both her written and spoken word poetry. She was a founding member of Slam NYU, the 2012 and 2013 national collegiate championship team, and a three-time member and former coach of the DC Youth Slam Poetry team. Her written work, including The January Children (2017), has been translated into Arabic, Japanese, Estonian, Portuguese, and Greek. Her upcoming anthology, co-edited with Fatimah Asghar, is titled Halal If You Hear Me. Montego Bay native Sinclair is the award-winning author of Catacombs (2011) and Cannibal (2016). Her work, noted for its vivid, rebellious, sometimes “strange” and “disturbing” imagery, explores themes such as womanhood, otherness, and exile, as well as scenes and memories from her Jamaican childhood, history and race relations in America, where she currently resides and studies.

Fans of The Wire will also get to hear from the man behind the phenomenon, David Simon. The show may have ended 10 years ago, but it is still a cultural classic and often regarded as one of the best in TV history. Simon is a former Baltimore-based crime reporter and his knowledge gleaned from the beat and his time spent with detectives makes his books and television shows authentic. His most recent project, The Deuce, follows the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s. He will be in conversation with his wife, fellow crime fiction star Laura Lippman, during ‘Power Partners’ on Saturday afternoon. Lippman is one of the most acclaimed writers in crime fiction today, with 23 books and more than 20 awards to her name. Her Tess Monaghan series continues to be one of the most endearing works of crime fiction produced in the United States. Her latest novel, Sunburn, was published to rave reviews earlier this year in the United States and the UK.

David Simon

Aspiring writers will also get the chance to share their work with the public during two open mic sessions on Saturday.

The fire blazes long into the night on Friday with Midnight Ravers Live Concert and on Saturday with Cala-Clash. On Friday night, Protoje’s protégé Lila Iké and Naomi Cowan, daughter of reggae and gospel legends Carlene Davis and Tommy Cowan (OD) will open for international reggae star Etana and things get really ‘lit’ on Saturday night as ZJ Nova faces off against Bad Gyal Marie in ‘Cala-Clash’.

Join the conversation online by using the hashtags #calabash2018 and #calabashLitUp

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Tropical Storm Names 2018

June 1 through November 30 is recognised annually as the Atlantic Hurricane Season. This is the time during which tropical storms and hurricane systems usually form in the Atlantic Ocean. Since 1950, the custom has been to name the hurricanes and tropical storms. This practice was started by the United States National Hurricane Center to help people to better keep track of different systems, to improve communication about these systems. With a name attached to each tropical storm or hurricane, it is easier for persons to stay alert about which systems are more likely to affect them, and to take the necessary precautions.

The practice of naming hurricanes is now under the purview of the World Meterological Organization, who generate and publish a list of names for hurricanes each year. Here’s the list of tropical storm names for the year 2018:

Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sara
Tony
Valerie
William

Source: EarthSky

Dig further: Check out our other posts on hurricanes:

What is a Flash Flood, Flash Flood Watch and Flash Flood Warning?

Jamaica’s Hurricane History: A Timeline

The 5 Big BE’s for Emergencies

Disaster Preparedness Month: In Case Of Flood

12 Hurricane Preparation Tips

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