5 Times Miss Lou Spoke To The Fighter In Jamaicans

1. When jackass back strong, dem overload him hampa …

Translation: When the donkey’s back is strong, they overload his hamper.

Ever had one of those days when you were sure that everything and everyone had chosen you to pick on? One of those days when you wanted to tell yourself that fate-full Murphy had definitely decided on you as his/her prime candidate? For days like these, Miss Lou reminds us that it’s the strong jackass (not calling you a jackass or anything now) that carries the most load. A weaker person couldn’t manage all the things you are going through. But you can. It may seem like more than you can bear, but you are capable of living through this and moving past it. Trust Miss Lou on that.

2. No care how teacha cross, school boun’ fi gi recess.

Translation: No matter how angry the teacher is, school will definitely give recess.

Remember those school days when teacher was ‘cross’ – angry, miserable and particularly severe on students? Days when the entire class had to walk on tenterhooks so as not to disturb an already disturbed teacher? Remember how endless those days seemed? Life sometimes feels like that – like a series of never-ending encounters with miserable, angry and inexplicably crabby people. And it feels like this goes on forever. Miss Lou says, no matter how arduous and difficult your life seems now, there will come a moment of respite. School will give recess. You will get a break somehow – it’s bound to happen!

3. Lickle bit a ram goat got beard and big bull nuh hab none.

Translation: As small as a ram goat is, he has a beard, and the big bull doesn’t.

Do you feel small and insignificant? Maybe you feel overlooked and your self-esteem has taken a beating. In this scenario, you would be the ram goat – a tiny creature in comparison to, say, a bull. Miss Lou wants you to know that even though you are small in stature, you carry valuable assets that others do not – like the ram goat’s beard. But also remember that this saying could easily be a reminder to not judge by appearances, because even though the bull doesn’t have a majestic beard, it is the larger and more powerful creature. Take heed.

4. Tedeh fi me, tomorrow fi yuh.

Translation: Today for me, tomorrow for you.

This is perhaps one of the most oft-repeated sayings in Jamaica, especially after the speaker has been mistreated by another person. It’s a reminder that time is the great equaliser, and the wrong done to you today can be rectified tomorrow. What doesn’t work in your favour today can work in your favour tomorrow.

5. A no every mango got maggish.

Translation: Not every mango has maggots.

There is good out there, Miss Lou wants you to know – good as good as a beautiful, juicy, worm-free mango. Not all mangoes carry maggots. Likewise, in life, not all situations will stay bad or difficult. Good will come to you. So don’t give up. Keep on going.

Posted in #diGoftheday, Culture, Diaspora, Heritage, Jamaica, Lists, Music and Culture Tagged with: , , , , , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Billions for Zones of Special Operations
  2. Major oil spill in Kingston Harbour
  3. Public hospitals loosing big to insurance companies
  4. Boyz hunt last four spot at Gold Cup
  5. Prominent MoBay businessman executed by shottas
  6. New security measures for schools

1. Billions for Zones of Special Operations

The Andrew Holness administration has pumped an additional $2.574 billion into the Ministry of National Security to assist in rolling out the Zones of Special Operations crime initiative, which is intended to target communities rocked by rampant criminality. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Major oil spill in Kingston Harbour

The National Environment and Planning Agency (NEPA) is reporting that there is a major oil spill in the Kingston Harbour in the vicinity of Petrojam. NEPA says preliminary information is that the spill occurred about 10 o’clock this morning. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Public hospitals losing big to insurance companies

Already struggling and under-resourced, public hospitals are losing an estimated $300 million to insurance companies from individuals with health coverage who are preying on public hospitals where services are ‘free’. Under the no-user-fee policy, hospitals are entitled to receive fees from insurance companies where a policy holder uses the public-health facilities. However, patients were not disclosing their status, which was giving the ministry a headache. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Boyz hunt last four spot at Gold Cup

The Reggae Boyz will this evening hope to have their best performance yet at the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup when they go up against Canada in the quarter-final at the University of Phoenix Stadium. Kick off time is 6:30. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Prominent MoBay businessman executed by shottas

The Montego Bay business community was thrown into mourning yesterday afternoon when prominent 52-year-old businessman Winston Chue, of a Westgate Hill address, was murdered gangland-style on Miriam Way in the downtown section of the western city. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. New security measures for schools

The Government will be seeking to implement a number of programmes, in partner-ship with Japanese educational institutions, as part of an integrated approach to safety and security in the local school curriculum. Addressing yesterday’s post Cabinet media briefing at Jamaica House, Education Minister Ruel Reid announced that partnerships have been established with universities and high schools in Japan for the development and offering of programmes on disaster science and green engineering, as well for the setting up of a new science school in the island. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

Amandla! Nelson Mandela’s Epic Jamaica Visit

When Nelson Mandela stood to address Jamaicans on Jamaican soil at the National Stadium, his first words were, “This is the happiest day of my life!” The date was Wednesday, July 24, 1991, and perhaps only the excitement and euphoria of the visit of American President Barack Obama to Jamaica in April 2015 can be compared to this historic moment.

Mandela and his wife, Winnie, received an overwhelming welcome from Jamaicans, and were ushered into a full day’s schedule of activities: the unveiling of a plaque naming Mandela Park in his honour in Half-Way Tree, an address to the House of Representatives and Senate at Gordon House, a wreath-laying ceremony at National Heroes Park, a luncheon with CARICOM heads of government at Vale Royal.

To start his day, the then African  National Congress (ANC) president attended a ceremony at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, where he received a honorary doctorate degree. Then it was off to Parliament, where Michael Manley, prime minister of Jamaica at the time, offered Jamaica’s “limited” resources to the ANC to help build a democratic system in South Africa after the ravages of apartheid. He said while the country couldn’t offer financial assistance, it could gladly lend assistance in the areas of political organisation, arrangement of restitutional law, training of cadres for government and training of professionals.

“We may have little money,” The Gleaner quotes Manley as saying, “But we have abundant human skills and inexhaustible will to be your partners in building a free, unified, democratic South Africa.” He also told Mandela: “When you set foot on our soil, we’re welcoming one of the great symbols of courage and heroism in our time.” A motion was brought before Parliament, and agreed on by Manley and then leader of the Opposition, Edward Seaga, to support the anti-apartheid struggle.

The final event was a concert/rally held in the night at the National Stadium to honour Mandela and his wife. Noteworthy was the turnout of Rastafarians, who swarmed streetsides along with other onlookers to get a glimpse or touch of the iconic African leader. This had not been witnessed since the visit of Emperor Selassie to Jamaica. Parents were hoisting children on their shoulders and over the heads of other onlookers in an effort to allow them to see the South African freedom fighter. Before Mandela’s arrival to the stadium, three persons were shot by police after unrest caused by persons in the bleachers trying to jump the fence to get on to the field. There were unconfirmed reports that one person died of the two men and one woman shot.

At the concert, Mandela was invested with the Order of Jamaica (OJ), the highest honour a non-national can receive, by then acting Governor General Edward Zacca. There were also addresses by some CARICOM heads of states, and performances by some of Jamaica’s top-ranked musicians.

Source: The Gleaner Archives

Posted in #diGoftheday, About Jamaica, Heritage, History, Jamaica, Men, Observances, Personalities, Politics, Uncategorized Tagged with: , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Police ask for citizen support in Zones of Special Operation
  2. Lee-Chin photo, name used in scam
  3. Vary Jones-Leslie meets tragic death in Cayman
  4. Constitutions fixes needed before law for dad’s names on children’s certificates
  5. J’can sentenced in Boston for lottery scamming
  6. 21 parcels of compressed ganja seized at KCT

1. Police ask for citizen support in Zones of Special Operation

As police and military personnel gear up to take over designated communities under the Zones of Special Operations Act, Superintendent of Police in charge of the Corporate Communications Unit, Stephanie Lindsay, is appealing for the public’s support, as the ultimate aim of implementing the new law, is to create a safe Jamaica for all. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Lee-Chin name, photo used in scam

Jamaican billionaire banker Michael Lee-Chin is said to be stunned by an attempt of fraudsters using his name and image to lure unsuspecting individuals to click on an advertisement, and who themselves become pawns in an online scheme to generate revenues from clicks. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Vary Jones-Leslie meets tragic death in Cayman

The medical community has been sent into shock and sadness by the death of consultant obstetrician-gynaecologist Vary Anetta Jones-Leslie, 62, who died in the Cayman Islands Hospital yesterday. She was struck down by a taxi after deplaning. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Constitutional fixes needed before law for dads’ names on children’s certificates

Prime Minister Andrew Holness says constitutional issues will have to be resolved before the Government can make it mandatory for the names of fathers to appear on birth certificates. He was responding to a question from by Central Kingston Member of Parliament, Ronald Thwaites, who sought an update on the legislation. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. J’can sentenced in Boston for lottery scamming

Jamaican Kemal Barnes has been sentenced to 15 months in prison by a federal court in Boston in the United States on a lottery scamming charge. The sentence was handed down on Monday. The 34-year-old man, who lives in Malden, Massachusetts, was also ordered to three years of supervised release and to pay US$118,367 in restitution. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. 21 parcels of compressed ganja seized at KCT

The police have seized 21 parcels of compressed ganja at the Kingston Freeport Terminal. The police say the drugs weight 65.5 pounds and have an estimated street value of $262,000. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

What Is Leptospirosis & How To Prevent It

Rats are said to be one to the most common transmitters of leptospirosis

What is leptospirosis?

Leptospirosis is an infectious disease caused by leptospira bacteria and transmitted to humans from from both wild and domestic animals. Domestic animals such as dogs, cattle, pigs, and horses can carry the bacteria for the disease, as well as rodents – who are often the primary culprits. Reptiles and amphibians can also transmit leptospira. The disease is not spread from person to person.

How is it contracted?

    • Swimming or wading in waters resulting from flooding
    • Eating foods contaminated with the urine, blood or tissue of infected animals
    • When contaminated foods come in contact with broken skin or the nose and eyes
    • Contact with contaminated soil or water
    • Being bitten by an infected animal

Symptoms of leptospirosis

    • High fever
    • Severe headache
    • Chills
    • Muscle aches
    • Vomiting
    • Jaundice (yellow skin and eyes)
    • Abdominal pain
    • Diarrhea
    • Rash

How to prevent leptospirosis

    • Rash
    • Do not swim or wade in water that might be contaminated with animal urine
    • Eliminate contact with potentially infected animals
    • Wear protective clothing or footwear if you must venture into areas or come in contact with water or soil that may be contaminated water or soil

How to treat leptospirosis

If you experience more than one of the symptoms of leptospirosis, contact a doctor immediately. It can take as little as three weeks, or as long as several months to recover from the disease. A doctor will recommend a course of treatment which normally includes antibiotics. However, for more severe cases, patients may need to be admitted to the hospital.

More on the disease

Leptospirosis can affect the heart, lungs, liver, kidney, or brain. It can also lead to meningitis, kidney or liver failure. If this happens, this severe form of leptospirosis is called Weil’s disease. It is more common in tropical climates, and according to Healthline, persons working in the following professions are at a higher risk of contracting the disease:

  • farmers
  • veterinarians
  • freshwater fishermen
  • butchers and others who work with dead animals
  • people who engage in water sports, like swimming, canoeing, rafting, or kayaking
  • people who bathe in fresh water lakes, rivers, or canals
  • rodent control workers
  • sewer workers
  • soldiers
  • miners

Sources: Ja Ministry of Health, The CDC, Healthline

Posted in General Information, Health, Jamaica, Wellness Tagged with: , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. PNP to take Trafigura case to Privy Council
  2. Lottery scamming mastermind pleads guilty
  3. NSWMA defends self amid Clarendon leptospirosis concern
  4. Jamaica needs truth from politicians
  5. Spanish Town Hospital staff attacked
  6. Diaspora policy review on hold

1. PNP to take Trafigura case to Privy Council

There are indications that the Trafigura case is heading to the Privy Council based in the United Kingdom. This after the legal team representing former president of the People’s National Party (PNP) Portia Simpson Miller and four other party functionaries met to decide their next move. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Lottery scamming mastermind pleads guilty

Lavrick Willocks, the Jamaican alleged mastermind of a lottery scam that duped dozens of Americans out of millions of dollars has agreed to plead guilty in a deal with federal prosecutors in North Dakota. The Associated Press says the agreement signed by the defence and prosecutors on Friday, calls for Willocks to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. NSWMA defends self amid Clarendon leptospirosis concern

Executive Director of the National Solid Waste Management Authority (NSWMA), Audley Gordon, is dismissing claims by Opposition Spokesman on Local Government, Noel Arscot, that poor garbage collection by the agency is responsible for the increase in cases of leptospirosis in Clarendon. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Jamaica needs truth from politicians

A truth-telling medium for Jamaican politicians is the latest recommendation from a senator concerned that the corruption fight will not be won with just laws. Matthew Samuda, a government senator, gave the recommendation last Friday as he contributed to the debate on the Integrity Commission bill that will establish a single anti-corruption agency. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Spanish Town Hospital staff attacked

The management of Spanish Town Hospital in St Catherine is giving the assurance that security measures have been stepped up there in the wake of two recent attacks on medical personnel that have left the victims traumatised. On Saturday night, a medical intern had to make a hasty retreat to the doctors’ living quarters at the hospital after she was attacked by a knife-wielding intruder. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. Diaspora policy review on hold

The review of a draft national diaspora policy has been put on hold until other key government processes are finished, Kamina Johnson Smith, the foreign affairs and foreign trade minister, has said. She told a Gleaner Editors’ Forum last week that part of the policy is linked to the Economic Growth Council (EGC), the body established last year to oversee projects aimed at helping the Government achieve five per cent GDP growth in four years, or by 2020-2021. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Truckers strike
  2. Power outage to affect Westmoreland water supply
  3. Diaspora encourages medical tourism
  4. Strengthen whistleblower provision – Opposition
  5. Lepto infections from garbage, says PNP
  6. New chancellor for UWI

1. Truckers strike

Disgruntled truckers at the Kingston Container Terminal have withdrawn their services over frustration with delays in retrieving cargo that is causing them to lose money. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

2. Power outage to affect Westmoreland water supply

The National Water Commission (NWC) is advising that, due to scheduled JPSCO maintenance work between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Tuesday, some customers in Westmoreland will be without piped water.  See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

3. Diaspora encourages medical tourism

With members of the Jamaican diaspora expressing serious interest in pouring investments into the local health sector, the Government, through its trade and investment promotion vehicle, JAMPRO, is working feverishly with the health ministry to craft a policy to facilitate health tourism in Jamaica. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

4. Strengthen whistleblower provision – Opposition

Opposition Senators believe that the whistle-blower provision in the proposed Integrity Commission Act does not adequately protect workers. The Senate debated the bill on Friday. The provision states that it is a criminal offence for an employer to victimise a worker who files a report. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

5. Lepto infections from garbage, says PNP

The Opposition People’s National Party (PNP) is blaming the increase in leptospirosis infections in Clarendon on poor garbage collection and waste management. Opposition spokesman on Local Government, Noel Arscott, says there is now a rat infestation problem in the northern section of the parish. He is raising alarm that there could be an outbreak of leptospirosis infections beyond the borders of the parish if the situation is not addressed. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

6. New chancellor for UWI

The University of the West Indies (UWI) has a new Chancellor, Trinidadian Robert Bermudez. The Chancellor is the highest office-holder in The UWI system. Chancellor Bermudez assumed duties today as the 6th Chancellor of the University, having been appointed at the University Council’s annual business meeting on April 27, 2017 to succeed Sir George Alleyne. See full story on The Gleaner’s website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,

Traffic Charges in Jamaica

Robert Montague, Jamaica’s minister of national security, recently made the announcement in Parliament that the Government would offer motorists traffic ticket amnesty as of July 1, 2017. The amnesty will run for 60 days thereafter.

Below is a list of some of the fines in the Road Traffic Act.

Offences in respect of which a fixed penalty may be paid to a collector of taxes

1) Driving motor vehicle with no valid certificate of fitness – $5,000

2) Driving motor vehicle without it being registered – $10,000

3) Driving motor vehicle without it being licensed in the prescribed manner – $10,000

4) Driving motor vehicle without evidence of insurance or failing to surrender evidence of insurance – $15,000

5) Driving motor vehicle (a) with licence decal obscured – $5,000

(b) with licence decal not affixed – $5,000

(c) licence plates obscured or not easily distinguished – $5,000

(d) licence plates not affixed as prescribed – $5,000

6) Driving motor vehicle contrary to terms of licence – $15,000

7) Driving motor vehicle without driver’s licence or learner’s permit in possession – $2,000

8) Failing to comply with the conditions of learner’s licence – $6,000

9) Failing to comply with the conditions of first year of driver’s licence – $6,000

10) Failing to notify authority of change of place of residence – $2,000

11) Failing to obey red light or stop sign – $12,000

12) Failing to comply with any other traffic sign – $8,000

13) Turning into or crossing major road so as to obstruct traffic – $9,000

14) Exceeding the speed limit by

(a) 16 km/h to 32 km/h – $6,000

(b) 33 km/h to 49 km/h – $10,000

(c) 50 km/h or more – $15,000

15) Driving on to one road from another and causing traffic obstruction – $10,000

16) Driving motor vehicle in violation of the rules of the road by:

(a) failing to keep to the nearside of road when approaching or being overtaken – $5,000

(b) overtaking on the nearside of other traffic – $5,000

(c) failing to allow passage to other overtaking vehicles – $10,000

(d) overtaking in a manner causing obstruction to oncoming traffic – $10,000

(e) crossing or turning so as to obstruct traffic – $9,000

(f) driving on to a road from another in a manner causing obstruction – $9,000

(g) driving from onto a place not being a road in a manner causing obstruction to traffic – $9,000

(h) travelling backwards further than necessary – $9,000

(i) failing to place motor vehicle when not in motion at the near side of roadway – $3,000

(j) failing to place motor vehicle in position so as not to obstruct traffic – $3,000

(k) person pouring petrol, driver leaves vehicle unattended – $7,000

(1) parking a vehicle in a zone designated for parking and failing to observe the rules pertaining to parking or failing to pay charge – $2,000

(m) person wilfully or unnecessarily preventing hindering or interrupting free passage of vehicular or pedestrian traffic – $13,000

(n) placing on or abandoning object on road that may endanger or cause damage to vehicular or pedestrian traffic – $13,000

(o) using cell phone, while driving or while functioning as instructor – $13,000

17) Careless driving where no collision occurs – $11,000

18) Careless driving where collision occurs – $25,000

19) Disobeying directions or signal of constable in execution of his duty – $5,000

20) Driver of motorcycle not causing pillion rider to wear prescribed protective helmet – $5,000

21) Failing to observe silence zones – $7,000

22) Failing to observe school safety zone – $10,000

23) Exceeding speed limit within school safety zone – $10,000

24) Exceeding speed limit within construction work zone – $10,000

25) Failing to comply with a sign of school crossing patrol to stop – $5,000

26) Driver of motor vehicle failing to yield the right of way when pedestrian in pedestrian crossing – $7,000

27) Driver of motor vehicle passing vehicle stopped in pedestrian crossing – $10,000

28) Driver of motor vehicle putting vehicle in motion while signal to stop is still exhibited – $13,000

29) Person pouring petrol into or on vehicle while engine running or naked light is alight – $10,000

30) Person with intent to defraud, interfere with or operate parking meter – $15,000

31) Driver of motor vehicle leaves vehicle unattended without stopping the engine – $4,000

32) Failing to place motor vehicle when not in motion at the near side of roadway – $7,000

33) Failing to place motor vehicle in position so as not to obstruct traffic – $7,000

34) Failing to use appropriate hand signal – $2,000

35) Driver of motor vehicle failing to give appropriate signal to indicate direction when turning – $7,000

36) Driver of motor vehicle failing to obey commands of constable to stop or keep motor vehicle stationary – $6,000

37) Failing to obey police signals – $7,500

38) Unnecessarily hinder, interrupt or otherwise obstruct the free and proper passage of vehicle or pedestrian – $5,000

39) Placing or abandoning object on road that may endanger or cause damage to vehicular or pedestrian traffic – $5,000

40) Refusing to weigh or test vehicle – $50,000

41) Driver causing vehicle to obstruct road or parked while being loaded or unloaded – $7,000

42) Use of electronic communication device while driving – $10,000

43) Use of electronic video device within driver’s line of sight while driving – $13,000

45) Using or driving or permitting to be used motor vehicle in a defective condition – $15,000

Posted in Crime and Security, Jamaica, Lists, Numbers, Uncategorized Tagged with: ,

What Can You Do With JM$8 million?

Prime Minister Andrew Holness has made it clear that he will be requiring his ministers to clear up hefty telephone bills after RJR News revealed on Monday, July 10, 2017 that some Government ministers had bills running into millions of dollars. The most astounding figure was Finance Minister Audley Shaw’s $8.34 million bill, accrued between March 2016 and February 2017. In response to the revelation, Shaw said the bill was the result of expensive roaming charges incurred on his overseas trips. The figure got diGJamaica thinking … what could $8 million do for the average Jamaican? We’ve compiled a list below.

  • Purchase a small studio apartment
  • Pay for two 2016 Toyota Corolla 1600 XLI cars
  • Pay the undergraduate tuition fees of 29 Humanities/Social Sciences students at the University of the West Indies, Mona
  • Pay for 133 biopsy procedures (at the cheapest cost – $60,000)
  • Pay for 312 US visa applications
  • Pay for 457 persons’ one-week hospital stay (cost of the bed)
  • Pay 1,290 minimum wage workers for a 40-hour workweek
  • Purchase 11,034 KFC Meal Deals
  • Pay bus fare for 40,000 students to and from school ($200) in a day

See The Gleaner’s coverage of the telephone bill controversy here:

Unacceptable! Holness Demands Ministers Clear Up High Cell Phone Bills
Shaw Faces Fresh Criticisms Over Discount on $8.34 million Phone Bill
Shaw Takes To Twitter To Explain $8.34 million Cell Phone Bill

Posted in #behindthenews, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News, Numbers, Politics

6 Things You Need To Know Today

Your news in a nutshell

  1. Ja needs no Robin hoods, declares Holness
  2. Shaw explains $8.34m cell bill on Twitter
  3. Forensic pathologist says teen was alive wen shot again
  4. When criminal cases collapse
  5. PAAC wants business plan for MoBay Convention Centre
  6. Six win all-expense-paid trip to Bolt’s last strike

 

Holness

1. Ja needs no Robin Hoods, declares Holness

In declaring that criminal organisations are adamantly seeking to run a parallel state, Prime Minister Andrew Holness has once again come out in defence of the recently passed Zones of Special Operations Bill, voicing confidence that crime and violence will be reduced in areas where dons and criminals thrive as a result of its implementation. See full story on The Gleaner website.

2. Shaw explains $8.34 cell bill on Twitter

Embattled Finance Minister Audley Shaw has disclosed more information as he seeks to explain his $8.34 million in cell phone bills in a year. In posts on his official Twitter account this afternoon, Mr Shaw reiterated that the bulk of the money was for data charges. He said when he queried about excessive charges on his bill, he was told that they were attributable to data roaming charges billed at US$8 per megabyte. See full story on The Gleaner website.

3. Forensic pathologist says teen was alive when shot again

A forensic pathologist has testified that, Ravin Thompson, the teenage boy who was shot during a joint police-military operation in Whitfield Town, St Andrew in 2007 was alive when he was wounded a second time. According to Dr S N Prasad Kadiyala, a post-mortem examination revealed that Thompson was shot three times and died from the cumulative effects of the three bullets. See full story on The Gleaner website.

4. When criminal cases collapse

No one alive in Jamaica in September 2012 will easily forget the national outrage that greeted the rape of an eight-year-old girl and four others in Irwin Point, St James. Neither will one quickly forget the collective sigh of relief when it was revealed that two men would pay for the crime. See full story on The Gleaner website.

5. PAAC wants business plan for MoBay Convention Centre

Parliament’s Public Administration and Appropriations Committee (PAAC) has asked the Tourism Ministry to submit plans for moving the Montego Convention Centre into profitability. The centre has been operating at a loss since it opened in 2011. See full story on The Gleaner website.

6. Six win all-expense-paid trip to Bolt’s last strike

Loxley Tulloch is a neighbour of the legendary Usain Bolt in the Corporate Area, but the avid track fan has never seen the sprinting phenomenon blaze down the track in ‘live and living colour’. However, that will change soon, as the shipping executive and his wife are preparing to jet off to London, England, to attend the 16th IAAF World Championships, August 4-13, and to see Bolt perform in his final hurrah. See full story on The Gleaner website.

Posted in 6 Things You Need To Know Today, Hot Topics, Jamaica, Lists, News Tagged with: , , , , ,